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Antarctic ice shelf disintegration triggered by sea ice loss and ocean swell

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
27 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
134 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
123 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Antarctic ice shelf disintegration triggered by sea ice loss and ocean swell
Published in
Nature, June 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41586-018-0212-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert A. Massom, Theodore A. Scambos, Luke G. Bennetts, Phillip Reid, Vernon A. Squire, Sharon E. Stammerjohn

Abstract

Understanding the causes of recent catastrophic ice shelf disintegrations is a crucial step towards improving coupled models of the Antarctic Ice Sheet and predicting its future state and contribution to sea-level rise. An overlooked climate-related causal factor is regional sea ice loss. Here we show that for the disintegration events observed (the collapse of the Larsen A and B and Wilkins ice shelves), the increased seasonal absence of a protective sea ice buffer enabled increased flexure of vulnerable outer ice shelf margins by ocean swells that probably weakened them to the point of calving. This outer-margin calving triggered wider-scale disintegration of ice shelves compromised by multiple factors in preceding years, with key prerequisites being extensive flooding and outer-margin fracturing. Wave-induced flexure is particularly effective in outermost ice shelf regions thinned by bottom crevassing. Our analysis of satellite and ocean-wave data and modelling of combined ice shelf, sea ice and wave properties highlights the need for ice sheet models to account for sea ice and ocean waves.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 134 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 123 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 123 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 28%
Researcher 26 21%
Unspecified 16 13%
Professor 12 10%
Student > Master 9 7%
Other 26 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 67 54%
Unspecified 17 14%
Environmental Science 15 12%
Physics and Astronomy 6 5%
Mathematics 5 4%
Other 13 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 301. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 February 2019.
All research outputs
#36,454
of 12,974,522 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#4,027
of 68,026 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,880
of 270,712 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#168
of 887 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,974,522 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 68,026 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 74.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,712 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 887 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.