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People with diagnosed HIV infection not attending for specialist clinical care: UK national review

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)

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16 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

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18 Mendeley
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Title
People with diagnosed HIV infection not attending for specialist clinical care: UK national review
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-1036-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hilary Curtis, Z. Yin, K. Clay, A. E. Brown, V. C. Delpech, E. Ong

Abstract

Regular clinical care is important for the well-being of people with HIV. We sought to  audit and describe the characteristics of adults with diagnosed HIV infection not reported to be attending for clinical care in the UK. Public Health England (PHE) provided clinics with lists of patients diagnosed or seen for specialist HIV care in 2010 but not linked to a clinic report or known to have died in 2011. Clinics reviewed case-notes of these individuals and completed questionnaires. A nested case-control analysis was conducted to compare those who had remained in the UK in 2011 while not attending care with individuals who received specialist HIV care in both 2010 and 2011. Among 74,418 adults living with diagnosed HIV infection in the UK in 2010, 3510 (4.7 %) were not reported as seen for clinical care or died in 2011. Case note reviews and outcomes were available for 2255 (64 %) of these: 456 (20.2 %) remained in the UK and did not attend care; 590 (26.2 %) left UK; 508 (22.6 %) received care in the UK: 73 (3.2 %) died and 628 (27.8 %) had no documented outcome. Individuals remaining in the UK and not attending care were more likely to be treatment naïve than those in care, but duration since HIV diagnosis was not significant. HIV/AIDS related hospitalisations were observed among non-attenders. Retention in UK specialist HIV care is excellent. Our audit indicates that the 'true' loss to follow up rate in 2011 was <2.5 % with no evidence of health tourism. Novel interventions to ensure high levels of clinic engagement should be explored to minimise disease progression among non-attenders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 6%
Unknown 17 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 28%
Student > Master 5 28%
Student > Bachelor 2 11%
Professor 1 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 6%
Other 3 17%
Unknown 1 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 56%
Social Sciences 3 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Unknown 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 September 2015.
All research outputs
#1,245,613
of 12,416,255 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#405
of 4,619 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,692
of 236,243 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,416,255 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,619 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 236,243 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them