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Role of non-coding RNAs in non-aging-related neurological disorders

Overview of attention for article published in Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
67 Mendeley
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Title
Role of non-coding RNAs in non-aging-related neurological disorders
Published in
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research, January 2018
DOI 10.1590/1414-431x20187566
Pubmed ID
Authors

A.S. Vieira, D.B. Dogini, I. Lopes-Cendes

Abstract

Protein coding sequences represent only 2% of the human genome. Recent advances have demonstrated that a significant portion of the genome is actively transcribed as non-coding RNA molecules. These non-coding RNAs are emerging as key players in the regulation of biological processes, and act as "fine-tuners" of gene expression. Neurological disorders are caused by a wide range of genetic mutations, epigenetic and environmental factors, and the exact pathophysiology of many of these conditions is still unknown. It is currently recognized that dysregulations in the expression of non-coding RNAs are present in many neurological disorders and may be relevant in the mechanisms leading to disease. In addition, circulating non-coding RNAs are emerging as potential biomarkers with great potential impact in clinical practice. In this review, we discuss mainly the role of microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs in several neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, Huntington disease, fragile X-associated ataxia, spinocerebellar ataxias, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and pain. In addition, we give information about the conditions where microRNAs have demonstrated to be potential biomarkers such as in epilepsy, pain, and ALS.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 67 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 18%
Student > Master 10 15%
Researcher 7 10%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Unspecified 5 7%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 19 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 15 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 10%
Unspecified 5 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 3%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 20 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 June 2018.
All research outputs
#2,920,744
of 21,431,229 outputs
Outputs from Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research
#56
of 580 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,080
of 298,527 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research
#2
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,431,229 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 580 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,527 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.