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Exposure to Human-Associated Chemical Markers of Fecal Contamination and Self-Reported Illness among Swimmers at Recreational Beaches

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, June 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
47 Mendeley
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Title
Exposure to Human-Associated Chemical Markers of Fecal Contamination and Self-Reported Illness among Swimmers at Recreational Beaches
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, June 2018
DOI 10.1021/acs.est.8b00639
Pubmed ID
Authors

Melanie D. Napier, Charles Poole, Jill R. Stewart, David J. Weber, Susan T. Glassmeyer, Dana W. Kolpin, Edward T. Furlong, Alfred P. Dufour, Timothy J. Wade

Abstract

Anthropogenic chemicals have been proposed as potential markers of human fecal contamination in recreational water. However, to date, there are no published studies describing their relationships with illness risks. Using a cohort of swimmers at seven U.S. beaches, we examined potential associations between the presence of chemical markers of human fecal pollution and self-reported gastrointestinal (GI) illness, diarrhea, and respiratory illness. Swimmers were surveyed about their beach activities, water exposure, and baseline symptoms on the day of their beach visit, and about any illness experienced 10-12 days later. Risk differences were estimated using model-based standardization and adjusted for the swimmer's age, beach site, sand contact, rainfall, and water temperature. Sixty-two chemical markers were analyzed from daily water samples at freshwater and marine beaches. Of those, 20 were found consistently. With the possible exception of bisphenol A and cholesterol, no chemicals were consistently associated with increased risks of illness. These two chemicals were suggestively associated with 2% and 1% increased risks of GI illness and diarrhea in both freshwater and marine beaches. Additional research using the more sensitive analytic methods currently available for a wider suite of analytes is needed to support the use of chemical biomarkers to quantify illness risk and identify fecal pollution sources.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 19%
Student > Master 7 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 3 6%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 8 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 15 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 12 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 June 2018.
All research outputs
#3,732,008
of 13,090,338 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#4,878
of 13,121 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,568
of 270,421 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#108
of 194 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,090,338 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,121 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,421 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 194 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.