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Determinants of Responsible Hiking Behavior: Results from a Stated Choice Experiment

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Management, April 2015
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2 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
55 Mendeley
Title
Determinants of Responsible Hiking Behavior: Results from a Stated Choice Experiment
Published in
Environmental Management, April 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00267-015-0513-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tian Guo, Jordan W. Smith, Yu-Fai Leung, Erin Seekamp, Roger L. Moore

Abstract

This research examined the determinants of responsible hiking behavior through a lab-based experiment in which two managerial factors believed to influence individuals' behavior (the presentation of an educational message and the method of displaying degraded trail conditions) were varied across four experimental treatments in a 2 × 2 between subjects factorial design. The effect of trail degradation type (muddiness and erosion) and severity (moderate or severe) of trail degradation were also examined within each of the 4 treatment groups. Analyses revealed neither the educational message nor the method of displaying the image had a consistent and expected impact on individuals' behavioral intentions. In fact, participants who viewed the educational message were more likely to indicate they would hike off the trail. The effects of both trail degradation type and severity were consistent and significant with muddiness and more severe levels of degradation having a greater influence on individuals' intent to hike on the edge of or off the trail. The analyses also revealed both gender and hiking frequency had significant effects on behavioral intentions. Female participants were more likely to indicate they would turn around than males when they encountered degraded trail sections. Women were also less likely to indicate they would hike off the trail than men. Collectively, these findings highlight a variety of ways recreation resource managers can more efficiently inform recreationists about the impacts of off-trail hiking and prioritize trail management needs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 2%
Malaysia 1 2%
Estonia 1 2%
Unknown 52 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 18%
Researcher 9 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 9%
Student > Bachelor 4 7%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 8 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 13 24%
Social Sciences 7 13%
Sports and Recreations 4 7%
Computer Science 3 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Other 14 25%
Unknown 11 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 August 2015.
All research outputs
#7,267,252
of 12,230,855 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Management
#772
of 1,118 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,546
of 237,892 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Management
#16
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,230,855 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,118 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,892 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.