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Methylmercury Dynamics in Upper Sacramento Valley Rice Fields with Low Background Soil Mercury Levels

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Environmental Quality, July 2018
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2 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

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6 Mendeley
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Title
Methylmercury Dynamics in Upper Sacramento Valley Rice Fields with Low Background Soil Mercury Levels
Published in
Journal of Environmental Quality, July 2018
DOI 10.2134/jeq2017.10.0390
Pubmed ID
Authors

K. Christy Tanner, Lisamarie Windham-Myers, Mark Marvin-DiPasquale, Jacob A. Fleck, Kenneth W. Tate, Bruce A. Linquist

Abstract

Few studies have considered how methylmercury (MeHg, a toxic form of Hg produced in anaerobic soils) production in rice ( L.) fields can affect water quality, and little is known about MeHg dynamics in rice fields. Surface water MeHg and total Hg (THg) imports, exports, and storage were studied in two commercial rice fields in the Sacramento Valley, California, where soil THg was low (25 and 57 ng g). The median concentration of MeHg in drainage water exiting the fields was 0.17 ng g (range: <0.007-2.1 ng g). Compared with irrigation water, drainage water had similar MeHg concentrations, and lower THg concentrations during the growing season. Significantly elevated drainage water MeHg and THg concentrations were observed in the fallow season compared with the growing season. An analysis of surface water loads indicates that fields were net importers of both MeHg (76-110 ng m) and THg (1947-7224 ng m) during the growing season, and net exporters of MeHg (35-200 ng m) and THg (248-6496 ng m) during the fallow season. At harvest, 190 to 700 ng MeHg m and 1400 to 1700 ng THg m were removed from fields in rice grain. Rice straw, which contained 120 to 180 ng MeHg m and 7000-10,500 ng m THg was incorporated into the soil. These results indicate that efforts to reduce MeHg and THg exports in rice drainage water should focus on the fallow season. Substantial amounts of MeHg and THg were stored in plants, and these pools should be considered in future studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 1 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 17%
Student > Bachelor 1 17%
Student > Master 1 17%
Unknown 2 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 1 17%
Environmental Science 1 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 17%
Unknown 3 50%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 June 2018.
All research outputs
#8,501,301
of 14,268,610 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Environmental Quality
#1,501
of 2,049 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#128,443
of 232,323 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Environmental Quality
#24
of 36 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,268,610 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,049 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,323 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 36 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.