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Protocol for the CHEST Australia Trial: a phase II randomised controlled trial of an intervention to reduce time-to-consult with symptoms of lung cancer

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Open, January 2015
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Title
Protocol for the CHEST Australia Trial: a phase II randomised controlled trial of an intervention to reduce time-to-consult with symptoms of lung cancer
Published in
BMJ Open, January 2015
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008046
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sonya R Murray, Peter Murchie, Neil Campbell, Fiona M Walter, Danielle Mazza, Emily Habgood, Yvonne Kutzer, Andrew Martin, Stephen Goodall, David J Barnes, Jon D Emery, Murray, Sonya R, Murchie, Peter, Campbell, Neil, Walter, Fiona M, Mazza, Danielle, Habgood, Emily, Kutzer, Yvonne, Martin, Andrew, Goodall, Stephen, Barnes, David J, Emery, Jon D, S. R. Murray, P. Murchie, N. Campbell, F. M. Walter, D. Mazza, E. Habgood, Y. Kutzer, A. Martin, S. Goodall, D. J. Barnes, J. D. Emery

Abstract

Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide, with 1.3 million new cases diagnosed every year. It has one of the lowest survival outcomes of any cancer because over two-thirds of patients are diagnosed when curative treatment is not possible. International research has focused on screening and community interventions to promote earlier presentation to a healthcare provider to improve early lung cancer detection. This paper describes the protocol for a phase II, multisite, randomised controlled trial, for patients at increased risk of lung cancer in the primary care setting, to facilitate early presentation with symptoms of lung cancer. The intervention is based on a previous Scottish CHEST Trial that comprised of a primary-care nurse consultation to discuss and implement a self-help manual, followed by self-monitoring reminders to improve symptom appraisal and encourage help-seeking in patients at increased risk of lung cancer. We aim to recruit 550 patients from two Australian states: Western Australia and Victoria. Patients will be randomised to the Intervention (a health consultation involving a self-help manual, monthly prompts and spirometry) or Control (spirometry followed by usual care). Eligible participants are long-term smokers with at least 20 pack years, aged 55 and over, including ex-smokers if their cessation date was less than 15 years ago. The primary outcome is consultation rate for respiratory symptoms. Ethical approval has been obtained from The University of Western Australia's Human Research Ethics Committee (RA/4/1/6018) and The University of Melbourne Human Research Committee (1 441 433). A summary of the results will be disseminated to participants and we plan to publish the main trial outcomes in a single paper. Further publications are anticipated after further data analysis. Findings will be presented at national and international conferences from late 2016. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry ACTRN 1261300039 3752.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 2%
Unknown 59 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 22%
Researcher 10 17%
Unspecified 9 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Other 9 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 32%
Unspecified 12 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 17%
Psychology 7 12%
Social Sciences 5 8%
Other 7 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 August 2015.
All research outputs
#2,908,173
of 5,472,368 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Open
#2,789
of 3,903 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#104,333
of 191,356 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Open
#206
of 277 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,472,368 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,903 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.6. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 191,356 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 277 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.