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Total skin self-examination at home for people treated for cutaneous melanoma: development and pilot of a digital intervention

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Open, January 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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48 Mendeley
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Title
Total skin self-examination at home for people treated for cutaneous melanoma: development and pilot of a digital intervention
Published in
BMJ Open, January 2015
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-007993
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter Murchie, Julia L Allan, William Brant, Matthew Dennis, Susan Hall, Judith Masthoff, Fiona M Walter, Marie Johnston, Murchie, Peter, Allan, Julia L, Brant, William, Dennis, Matthew, Hall, Susan, Masthoff, Judith, Walter, Fiona M, Johnston, Marie

Abstract

To develop a digital intervention to prompt, support, and respond to the outcomes of total skin self-examinations (TSSEs) at home by people treated for cutaneous melanoma. A complex intervention development study. Northeast Scotland. Semistructured scoping interviews; people previously treated for cutaneous melanoma (n=21). Pilot testing: people treated for melanoma stages 0-2C (n=20); general practitioners (n=6); and a nurse specialist in dermatology (n=1). A tablet-based digital intervention designed to prompt and support TSSEs comprising instructional videos and electronic reporting (including photographs) to a clinical nurse specialist in dermatology, with subsequent clinical triage. Qualitative assessment of intervention feasibility and acceptability, and quantitative assessment of intentions and confidence to perform TSSEs in pilot participants. The majority of pilot participants were strongly positive and adhered well to the intervention (n=15), with 7 of these reporting symptoms of concern at some point during the 6-month pilot. 4 patients complied intermittently, 3 reporting skin problems at least once during the pilot, and 1 withdrew. 2 patients underwent skin surgery as a result of participating in the pilot, with 1 diagnosed as having a recurrent melanoma and the other, a benign lesion. A number of practical issues to improve the usability of the intervention were identified. The proportion of participants reporting intention to check their skin at least monthly increased during the intervention as did confidence to conduct a skin check. People previously treated for cutaneous melanoma are prepared to use digital technology to support them in conducting TSSE. An intervention has been developed which is practical, effective and safe, and after addressing minor practical issues, could now be evaluated for clinical outcomes in a randomised clinical trial.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Switzerland 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 44 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 29%
Student > Master 7 15%
Unspecified 6 13%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Other 14 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 40%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 23%
Unspecified 8 17%
Social Sciences 4 8%
Computer Science 3 6%
Other 3 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 June 2016.
All research outputs
#1,873,842
of 7,917,108 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Open
#2,832
of 5,603 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#64,297
of 227,663 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Open
#139
of 285 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,917,108 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,603 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.9. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 227,663 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 285 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.