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Energetic costs of locomotion in bears: is plantigrade locomotion energetically economical?

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental Biology, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
60 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
42 Mendeley
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Title
Energetic costs of locomotion in bears: is plantigrade locomotion energetically economical?
Published in
Journal of Experimental Biology, June 2018
DOI 10.1242/jeb.175372
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anthony M. Pagano, Anthony M. Carnahan, Charles T. Robbins, Megan A. Owen, Tammy Batson, Nate Wagner, Amy Cutting, Nicole Nicassio-Hiskey, Amy Hash, Terrie M. Williams

Abstract

Ursids are the largest mammals to retain a plantigrade posture. This primitive posture has been proposed to result in reduced locomotor speed and economy relative to digitigrade and unguligrade species, particularly at high speeds. Previous energetics research on polar bears (Ursus maritimus) found locomotor costs were more than double predictions for similarly sized quadrupedal mammals, which could be a result of their plantigrade posture or due to adaptations to their Arctic marine existence. To evaluate whether polar bears are representative of terrestrial ursids or distinctly uneconomical walkers, this study measured the mass-specific metabolism, overall dynamic body acceleration, and gait kinematics of polar bears and grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) trained to rest and walk on a treadmill. At routine walking speeds, we found polar bears and grizzly bears exhibited similar costs of locomotion and gait kinematics, but differing measures of overall dynamic body acceleration. Minimum cost of transport while walking in the two species (2.21 J kg-1 m-1) was comparable to predictions for similarly sized quadrupedal mammals, but these costs doubled (4.42 J kg-1 m-1) at speeds ≥5.4 km h-1 Similar to humans, another large plantigrade mammal, bears appear to exhibit a greater economy while moving at slow speeds.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 60 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 29%
Student > Master 8 19%
Researcher 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Professor 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 7 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 43%
Engineering 4 10%
Environmental Science 2 5%
Psychology 1 2%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 10 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 131. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 June 2019.
All research outputs
#168,274
of 16,643,789 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental Biology
#111
of 6,972 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,499
of 280,647 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental Biology
#7
of 144 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,643,789 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,972 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,647 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 144 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.