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“Improving Native American elder access to and use of health care through effective health system navigation”

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, June 2018
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Title
“Improving Native American elder access to and use of health care through effective health system navigation”
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12913-018-3182-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cathleen E. Willging, David H. Sommerfeld, Elise Trott Jaramillo, Erik Lujan, Roxane Spruce Bly, Erin K. Debenport, Steven P. Verney, Ron Lujan

Abstract

Public insurance reforms of the past two decades have failed to substantively address the healthcare needs of American Indians in general, let alone the particular needs of American Indian elders, ages 55 years and older. Historically, this population is more likely to be uninsured and to suffer from greater morbidities, poorer health outcomes and quality of life, and lower life expectancies compared to all other United States aging populations, representing a neglected group within the healthcare system. Despite the pervasive belief that the Indian Health Service will address all their health-related needs, American Indian elders are negatively affected by gaps in insurance and lack of access to health care. While the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act included provisions to ameliorate disparities for American Indians, its future is uncertain. In this context, American Indian elders with variable health literacy must navigate a complex and unstable healthcare system, regardless of where they seek care. This community-driven study features a mixed-method, participatory design to examine help-seeking behavior and healthcare experiences of American Indian elders in New Mexico, in order to develop and evaluate a tailored intervention to enhance knowledge of, access to, and use of insurance and available services to reduce healthcare disparities. This study includes qualitative and quantitative interviews combined with concept mapping and focus groups with American Indian elders and other key stakeholders. The information gathered will generate new practical knowledge, grounded in actual perspectives of American Indian elders and other relevant stakeholders, to improve healthcare practices and policies for a population that has been largely excluded from national and state discussions of healthcare reform. Study data will inform development and evaluation of culturally tailored programming to enhance understanding and facilitate negotiation of the changing landscape of health care by American Indian elders. This work will fill a gap in research on public insurance initiatives, which do not typically focus on this population, and will offer a replicable model for enhancing the effects of such initiatives on other underserved groups affected by healthcare inequities. This protocol does not include the collection of health outcome data. Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT03550404 . Registered June 6, 2018.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 20%
Unspecified 8 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Other 14 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 12 26%
Social Sciences 8 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 11%
Computer Science 3 7%
Other 10 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 June 2018.
All research outputs
#11,645,431
of 13,110,606 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#4,038
of 4,360 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#232,137
of 268,114 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,110,606 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,360 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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