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The use of intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy and insecticide-treated bed nets for malaria prevention by women of child-bearing age in eight districts in Malawi

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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159 Mendeley
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Title
The use of intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy and insecticide-treated bed nets for malaria prevention by women of child-bearing age in eight districts in Malawi
Published in
Malaria Journal, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0840-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dyson Mwandama, Julie Gutman, Adam Wolkon, Madalitso Luka, James Jafali, Doreen Ali, Don P. Mathanga, Jacek Skarbinski

Abstract

Intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) and insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs) can reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with malaria in pregnancy. Although the coverage for both IPTp and ITN use have been described in Malawi, the analysis of factors associated with IPTp receipt and ITN use is lacking. This analysis was conducted to assess IPTp and ITN use and predictors of use by women of child-bearing age (WOCBA). A two-stage cluster-sample cross-sectional survey was conducted April 16-30, 2009 in eight districts across Malawi. Information on receipt of two or more doses of IPTp, ITN ownership, and ITN use the night before the survey was collected. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess predictors of IPTp and ITN use. Data were collected from 7407 households containing 6985 WOCBA and 3213 recently pregnant women (women who reported a completed pregnancy in the 2 years before the survey). Most recently pregnant women (96 %) had at least one antenatal care (ANC) clinic visit; 91 % reported receiving at least one dose of IPTp, and 72 % reported receiving two or more doses of IPTp. Women in Phalombe, Rumphi, and Lilongwe were more likely to receive two doses of IPTp than those in Blantyre [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 2.5 (95 % CI 1.5-4.5), 2.5 (95 % CI 1.5-4.3), and 2.0 (95 % CI 1.2-3.1), respectively]. Educated women were more likely to have received IPTp compared to women with no education [aOR 1.6 (95 % CI 1.0-2.6) for those who completed primary school, aOR1.9 (95 % CI 1.1-3.3) for some secondary school, and aOR 4.1 (95 % CI 1.9-8.7) for completed secondary school or above], and women in the poorest socioeconomic status quintile were less likely to receive IPTp than those in the least poor quintile [aOR 0.68 (95 % CI 0.48-0.97)]. In all, 53 % of WOCBA used an ITN the previous night. Women in Nkhotkhota and Phalombe were less likely to have slept under an ITN the previous night compared to those in Blantyre [aOR 0.52 (95 % CI 0.39-0.69) and aOR 0.67 (95 % CI 0.47-0.95), respectively]. In addition, age [aOR 0.61 (95 % CI 0.45-0.83) for women 15-19 years old], and either being currently pregnant [aOR 1.5 (95 % CI 1.2-2.0)] or having been pregnant in the previous 2 years [aOR 2.4, (95 % CI 2.1-2.8)] were associated with ITN use. In Malawi in 2009, IPTp and ITN use in WOCBA fell short of national and international goals. Adoption of new guidelines encouraging administration of IPTp at every scheduled ANC visit might increase IPTp use. Increasing health promotion activities to encourage earlier attendance at ANC clinics and create demand for IPTp and ITNs might improve overall IPTp and ITN use.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 159 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Nigeria 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Unknown 157 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 57 36%
Researcher 20 13%
Student > Bachelor 13 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 8%
Student > Postgraduate 10 6%
Other 22 14%
Unknown 25 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 47 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 41 26%
Social Sciences 16 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 3%
Other 13 8%
Unknown 27 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 August 2015.
All research outputs
#2,955,907
of 6,890,247 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,319
of 2,330 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#95,171
of 223,311 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#77
of 112 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,890,247 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 54th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,330 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,311 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 112 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.