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Molecular screening of microbial communities for candidate indicators of multiple metal impacts in marine sediments from northern Australia

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, January 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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22 Mendeley
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Title
Molecular screening of microbial communities for candidate indicators of multiple metal impacts in marine sediments from northern Australia
Published in
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, January 2016
DOI 10.1002/etc.3205
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alyssa Cornall, Alea Rose, Claire Streten, Keith McGuinness, David Parry, Karen Gibb

Abstract

Coastal sediments accumulate metals from anthropogenic sources and as a consequence industry is required to monitor sediment health. The total concentration of a metal does not necessarily reflect its potential toxicity or biological impact, so biological assessment tools are useful for monitoring. Rapid Biological Assessment (RBA) tools sensitive enough to detect relatively small increases in metal concentrations would provide early warning of future ecosystem impact. We investigated in situ populations of Archaea and Bacteria as potential tools for RBA in sediment at 4 northern-Australian coastal locations over 2 years, in both wet and dry seasons. The 1 M HCl-extractable concentrations of metals in sediment were measured, and Archaeal and Bacterial community profiles obtained by next-generation sequencing of sediment DNA. Species response curves were used to identify several taxonomic groups with potential as biological indicators of metal impact. Spatial variation, sediment grain size, water depth and dissolved oxygen also correlated with microbial population shifts. Seasonal variation was less important than geographic location. Metal-challenge culture trials supported the identification of metal resistant and sensitive taxa. In situ Archaea and Bacteria are potentially sensitive indicators for changes in bioavailable concentrations of metals, however the complexity of the system suggests that we also need to identify metal-specific functional genes that may be informed by these sequencing surveys, and thus provide a useful addition to identity-based assays. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 23%
Researcher 4 18%
Lecturer 2 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Other 2 9%
Other 4 18%
Unknown 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 4 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 7 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 August 2015.
All research outputs
#6,007,593
of 18,690,799 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#1,192
of 5,023 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#79,591
of 244,299 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#14
of 86 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,690,799 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 67th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,023 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 244,299 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 86 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.