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Repeated measures of inflammation, blood pressure, and heart rate variability associated with traffic exposures in healthy adults

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Health, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

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90 Mendeley
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Title
Repeated measures of inflammation, blood pressure, and heart rate variability associated with traffic exposures in healthy adults
Published in
Environmental Health, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12940-015-0049-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jaime E. Mirowsky, Richard E. Peltier, Morton Lippmann, George Thurston, Lung-Chi Chen, Lucas Neas, David Diaz-Sanchez, Robert Laumbach, Jacqueline D. Carter, Terry Gordon

Abstract

Previous human exposure studies of traffic-related air pollutants have demonstrated adverse health effects in human populations by comparing areas of high and low traffic, but few studies have utilized microenvironmental monitoring of pollutants at multiple traffic locations while looking at a vast array of health endpoints in the same population. We evaluated inflammatory markers, heart rate variability (HRV), blood pressure, exhaled nitric oxide, and lung function in healthy participants after exposures to varying mixtures of traffic pollutants. A repeated-measures, crossover study design was used in which 23 healthy, non-smoking adults had clinical cardiopulmonary and systemic inflammatory measurements taken prior to, immediately after, and 24 hours after intermittent walking for two hours in the summer months along three diverse roadways having unique emission characteristics. Measurements of PM2.5, PM10, black carbon (BC), elemental carbon (EC), and organic carbon (OC) were collected. Mixed effect models were used to assess changes in health effects associated with these specific pollutant classes. Minimal associations were observed with lung function measurements and the pollutants measured. Small decreases in BP measurements and rMSSD, and increases in IL-1β and the low frequency to high frequency ratio measured in HRV, were observed with increasing concentrations of PM2.5 EC. Small, acute changes in cardiovascular and inflammation-related effects of microenvironmental exposures to traffic-related air pollution were observed in a group of healthy young adults. The associations were most profound with the diesel-source EC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
United States 1 1%
France 1 1%
Unknown 87 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 20%
Researcher 18 20%
Student > Master 15 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Student > Bachelor 6 7%
Other 17 19%
Unknown 10 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 22 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 17%
Sports and Recreations 7 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 6%
Social Sciences 4 4%
Other 21 23%
Unknown 16 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 September 2015.
All research outputs
#262,077
of 6,344,633 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Health
#69
of 682 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,417
of 193,454 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Health
#4
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,344,633 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 682 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 193,454 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.