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Evolutionary patchwork of an insecticidal toxin shared between plant-associated pseudomonads and the insect pathogens Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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25 Dimensions

Readers on

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47 Mendeley
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Title
Evolutionary patchwork of an insecticidal toxin shared between plant-associated pseudomonads and the insect pathogens Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus
Published in
BMC Genomics, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12864-015-1763-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Beat Ruffner, Maria Péchy-Tarr, Monica Höfte, Guido Bloemberg, Jürg Grunder, Christoph Keel, Monika Maurhofer

Abstract

Root-colonizing fluorescent pseudomonads are known for their excellent abilities to protect plants against soil-borne fungal pathogens. Some of these bacteria produce an insecticidal toxin (Fit) suggesting that they may exploit insect hosts as a secondary niche. However, the ecological relevance of insect toxicity and the mechanisms driving the evolution of toxin production remain puzzling. Screening a large collection of plant-associated pseudomonads for insecticidal activity and presence of the Fit toxin revealed that Fit is highly indicative of insecticidal activity and predicts that Pseudomonas protegens and P. chlororaphis are exclusive Fit producers. A comparative evolutionary analysis of Fit toxin-producing Pseudomonas including the insect-pathogenic bacteria Photorhabdus and Xenorhadus, which produce the Fit related Mcf toxin, showed that fit genes are part of a dynamic genomic region with substantial presence/absence polymorphism and local variation in GC base composition. The patchy distribution and phylogenetic incongruence of fit genes indicate that the Fit cluster evolved via horizontal transfer, followed by functional integration of vertically transmitted genes, generating a unique Pseudomonas-specific insect toxin cluster. Our findings suggest that multiple independent evolutionary events led to formation of at least three versions of the Mcf/Fit toxin highlighting the dynamic nature of insect toxin evolution.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 2%
Poland 1 2%
Unknown 45 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 26%
Student > Bachelor 7 15%
Researcher 6 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 9 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 47%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 19%
Engineering 3 6%
Environmental Science 2 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 4%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 6 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 August 2015.
All research outputs
#2,534,946
of 5,487,749 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#2,569
of 4,857 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,730
of 178,889 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#164
of 249 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,487,749 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,857 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 178,889 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 249 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.