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Baseline Susceptibility to Pyrethroid and Organophosphate Insecticides in Two Old World Sand Fly Species (Diptera: Psychodidae).

Overview of attention for article published in U.S. Army Medical Department Journal, July 2015
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Title
Baseline Susceptibility to Pyrethroid and Organophosphate Insecticides in Two Old World Sand Fly Species (Diptera: Psychodidae).
Published in
U.S. Army Medical Department Journal, July 2015
Pubmed ID
Authors

Li, Andrew Y, Perez de Leon, Adalberto A, Linthicum, Kenneth J, Britch, Seth C, Bast, Joshua D, Debboun, Mustapha

Abstract

Phlebotomine sand flies are blood-feeding insects that transmit Leishmania parasites that cause various forms of cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis and sand fly fever viruses (Phlebovirus; Bunyaviridae) in humans. Sand flies pose a significant threat to US military personnel deployed to Leishmania-endemic and sand fly fever endemic regions which include Europe, the Mediterranean basin, Middle East, Central Asia, Southwest Asia, and Africa. A research project supported by the Department of Defense Deployed Warfighter Protection Program was initiated to evaluate the susceptibility of 2 Old World sand fly species, Phlebotomus papatasi and P duboscqi, to a number of commonly used pyrethroid and organophosphate insecticides. A new glass vial bioassay technique based on the CDC bottle assay was developed for this study. The exposure time-mortality relationship at a given insecticide concentration was determined for each insecticide, and their relative toxicity against the 2 sand fly species was ranked based on bioassay results. This study validated the new bioassay technique and also generated baseline insecticide susceptibility data to inform future insecticide resistance monitoring work.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sri Lanka 1 14%
Unknown 6 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 43%
Student > Master 1 14%
Student > Postgraduate 1 14%
Researcher 1 14%
Unspecified 1 14%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 29%
Unspecified 2 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 14%
Environmental Science 1 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 14%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 August 2015.
All research outputs
#4,565,437
of 5,487,590 outputs
Outputs from U.S. Army Medical Department Journal
#36
of 54 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#143,463
of 178,892 outputs
Outputs of similar age from U.S. Army Medical Department Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,487,590 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 54 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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