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Coupling between mean blood pressure and EEG in preterm neonates is associated with reduced illness severity scores

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, June 2018
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (59th percentile)

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8 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Coupling between mean blood pressure and EEG in preterm neonates is associated with reduced illness severity scores
Published in
PLOS ONE, June 2018
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0199587
Pubmed ID
Authors

Oksana Semenova, Gordon Lightbody, John M. O’Toole, Geraldine Boylan, Eugene Dempsey, Andriy Temko

Abstract

Hypotension or low blood pressure (BP) is a common problem in preterm neonates and has been associated with adverse short and long-term neurological outcomes. Deciding when and whether to treat hypotension relies on an understanding of the relationship between BP and brain functioning. This study aims to investigate the interaction (coupling) between BP and continuous multichannel unedited EEG recordings in preterm infants less than 32 weeks of gestational age. The EEG was represented by spectral power in four frequency sub-bands: 0.3-3 Hz, 3-8 Hz, 8-15 Hz and 15-30 Hz. BP was represented as mean arterial pressure (MAP). The level of coupling between the two physiological systems was estimated using linear and nonlinear methods such as correlation, coherence and mutual information. Causality of interaction was measured using transfer entropy. The illness severity was represented by the clinical risk index for babies (CRIB II score) and contrasted to the computed level of interaction. It is shown here that correlation and coherence, which are linear measures of the coupling between EEG and MAP, do not correlate with CRIB values, whereas adjusted mutual information, a nonlinear measure, is associated with CRIB scores (r = -0.57, p = 0.003). Mutual information is independent of the absolute values of MAP and EEG powers and quantifies the level of coupling between the short-term dynamics in both signals. The analysis indicated that the dominant causality is from changes in EEG producing changes in MAP. Transfer entropy (EEG to MAP) is associated with the CRIB score (0.3-3 Hz: r = 0.428, p = 0.033, 3-8 Hz: r = 0.44, p = 0.028, 8-15 Hz: r = 0.416, p = 0.038) and indicates that a higher level of directed coupling from brain activity to blood pressure is associated with increased illness in preterm infants. This is the first study to present the nonlinear measure of interaction between brain activity and blood pressure and to demonstrate its relation to the initial illness severity in the preterm infant. The obtained results allow us to hypothesise that the normal wellbeing of a preterm neonate can be characterised by a nonlinear coupling between brain activity and MAP, whereas the presence of weak coupling with distinctive directionality of information flow is associated with an increased mortality rate in preterms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 16%
Researcher 4 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 10 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 26%
Engineering 6 19%
Psychology 1 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 13 42%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 July 2018.
All research outputs
#5,253,512
of 20,582,425 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#57,219
of 177,649 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#91,208
of 293,825 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#913
of 2,250 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,582,425 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 177,649 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 293,825 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,250 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.