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Prescription patterns of traditional Chinese medicine amongst Taiwanese children: a population-based cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, June 2018
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Title
Prescription patterns of traditional Chinese medicine amongst Taiwanese children: a population-based cohort study
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12906-018-2261-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hwey-Fang Liang, Yao-Hsu Yang, Pau-Chung Chen, Hsing-Chun Kuo, Chia-Hao Chang, Ying-Hsiang Wang, Kuang-Ming Wu

Abstract

Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used by Chinese patients and in many other countries worldwide. However, epidemiological reports and prescription patterns on children are few. A cohort of 178,617 children aged 18 and under from one million randomly sampled cases of the National Health Insurance Research Database was analyzed for TCM prescription patterns. SAS 9.1 was applied and descriptive medicine utilization patterns were presented. The cohort included 112,889 children treated by TCM, with adolescents (12- to 18-year-olds) as the largest group. In the children's TCM outpatient visits, Chinese herbal remedies were the main treatment. The top three categories of diseases treated with Chinese herbal remedies were respiratory system; symptoms, signs, and ill-defined conditions; and digestive system. The top three categories using acupuncture were: injury and poisoning, diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue, and diseases of the respiratory system. Of the top ten herbal medicines prescribed by TCM physicians, the top nine herbal formulae and the top ten single herbs were associated with diseases of the respiratory system. This study identified patterns of TCM prescriptions for children and common disease categories treated with TCM. The results provide a useful reference for health policy makers and for those who consider the usage of TCM for children.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 38%
Unspecified 2 25%
Student > Master 1 13%
Other 1 13%
Professor 1 13%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 3 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 13%
Philosophy 1 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 13%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2018.
All research outputs
#11,820,352
of 13,322,622 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#2,196
of 2,698 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#231,871
of 267,938 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,322,622 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,698 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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