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Hyponatremia during hospitalization and in-hospital mortality in patients hospitalized from heart failure

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, August 2015
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Title
Hyponatremia during hospitalization and in-hospital mortality in patients hospitalized from heart failure
Published in
BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12872-015-0082-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. Saepudin, Patrick A. Ball, Hana Morrissey

Abstract

To date, the majority of studies on hyponatremia focussed on hyponatremia at admission, and came from developed countries. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of hyponatremia during hospitalization in patients hospitalized for HF and its association with in-hospital mortality. This was an observational study using retrospective data from patients' records between 2010-2013. It focused on those patients carrying an ICD-10 code of 150.0(Congestive Heart Failure) as their primary diagnosis. Hyponatremia during hospitalization was defined as serum sodium level lower than 135 mEq/L obtained from a blood chemistry measurement on the next days after admission. Patients' characteristics were examined and the association between hyponatremia during hospitalization and in-hospital mortality was analyzed. Among 464 patients hospitalized for HF, hyponatremia during hospitalization was observed in 22 % of patients with 44 % of this group had normal serum sodium level on admission. Hyponatremia during hospitalization was associated with lower blood pressure on admission, both systolic and diastolic, peripheral oedema, ascites and fatigue. Patients having history of hospitalization for cardiac diseases and renal failure were higher in patients developing hyponatremia during hospitalization. In this group, amiodarone, heparin, insulin and antibiotics were administered more frequently. Factors potentially increase the risk of hyponatremia during hospitalization include history of fatigue (OR = 3.23, 95 % CI 1.79-5.82), presence of ascites (4.14, 1.84-9.31), and administration of heparin (3.85, 1.78-8.31) and antibiotics (3.08, 1.71-5.53). Length of hospital stay was significantly longer in patients with hyponatremia during hospitalization and in-hospital mortality was also higher compared to non-hyponatremic patients, 7.7 % and 29.1 %, respectively. This study found that the prevalence of hyponatremia during hospitalization in patients hospitalized for HF was almost the same as hyponatremia on admission and administration of heparin and antibiotics can potentially worsen hyponatremia during hospitalization. In this study population, hyponatremia during hospitalization was found to be associated with in-hospital mortality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 55 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 13%
Other 4 7%
Researcher 4 7%
Student > Master 4 7%
Other 14 25%
Unknown 11 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 29 53%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Sports and Recreations 1 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 15 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 February 2021.
All research outputs
#11,413,555
of 18,750,173 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cardiovascular Disorders
#502
of 1,224 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,295
of 247,486 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cardiovascular Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,750,173 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,224 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 247,486 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them