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Implementing alcohol screening and brief interventions in primary health care: study protocol for a pilot cluster randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Family Practice, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters

Readers on

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8 Mendeley
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Title
Implementing alcohol screening and brief interventions in primary health care: study protocol for a pilot cluster randomized controlled trial
Published in
Family Practice, June 2018
DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmy062
Pubmed ID
Authors

Frederico Rosário, Milica Vasiljevic, Leo Pas, Niamh Fitzgerald, Cristina Ribeiro

Abstract

Alcohol is one of the most important risk factors contributing to the global burden of disease. Screening and brief interventions in primary care settings are effective in reducing alcohol consumption. However, implementation of such interventions in routine practice has been proven difficult. Most programmes in practice and research have lacked a theoretical rationale for how they would change practitioner behaviour. To determine whether a theory-based behaviour change intervention delivered to primary care practices significantly increases delivery of alcohol screening. We will conduct a two-arm, cluster-randomized controlled, parallel, open trial. Twelve primary care practices will be randomized to one of two groups: training and support; and waiting-list control. Family physicians, nurses and receptionists will be eligible to participate. The intervention will be a training and support programme. The intervention will be tailored to the barriers and facilitators for implementing alcohol screening and brief interventions following the principles of the Behaviour Change Wheel approach. The primary outcome will be the proportion of patients screened with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. This study will test whether a theory-driven implementation programme increases alcohol screening rates in primary care. Results from this trial will provide a useful addition to existing evidence by informing implementation researchers what areas of behaviour change are critical to increasing alcohol screening rates. clinicaltrials.gov NCT02968186.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 38%
Researcher 3 38%
Student > Postgraduate 1 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 13%
Student > Master 1 13%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 3 38%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 April 2019.
All research outputs
#3,374,405
of 13,652,000 outputs
Outputs from Family Practice
#420
of 1,423 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,948
of 268,899 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Family Practice
#19
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,652,000 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,423 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,899 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.