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Associations between proposed local government liquor store size classifications and alcohol consumption in young adults

Overview of attention for article published in Health & Place, July 2018
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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13 Mendeley
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Title
Associations between proposed local government liquor store size classifications and alcohol consumption in young adults
Published in
Health & Place, July 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.healthplace.2018.06.001
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah Foster, Paula Hooper, Matthew Knuiman, Leanne Lester, Georgina Trapp

Abstract

The prevalence of warehouse-style liquor stores has prompted alarm from local communities and public health advocates. To increase local government control over liquor stores, one proposed planning response is to distinguish between 'small' (i.e., ≤ 300 m2) and 'large' (i.e., > 300 m2) liquor stores. We mapped the size and location of liquor stores in Perth, Western Australia, and tested associations between liquor store exposure and alcohol consumption (grams ethanol/day) in young adults (n = 990). The count of liquor stores of any size within 1600 m and 1601-5000 m of home were significantly associated with increased alcohol intake, whereas larger stores (i.e., > 300 m2 and > 600 m2) were not associated with alcohol intake. Young adults' alcohol consumption appears to be impacted by liquor store density and convenience, rather than outlet size. However, the presence of multiple stores close to home increases market competition, driving alcohol prices down, and plausibly results in alcohol prices similar to those at liquor superstores.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 23%
Student > Bachelor 3 23%
Student > Master 2 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Researcher 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 2 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 31%
Social Sciences 2 15%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 8%
Environmental Science 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 3 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 June 2018.
All research outputs
#7,529,382
of 13,138,880 outputs
Outputs from Health & Place
#849
of 1,078 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#136,752
of 268,682 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health & Place
#21
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,138,880 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,078 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.9. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,682 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.