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Neural signal during immediate reward anticipation in schizophrenia: Relationship to real-world motivation and function

Overview of attention for article published in NeuroImage: Clinical, January 2015
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63 Mendeley
Title
Neural signal during immediate reward anticipation in schizophrenia: Relationship to real-world motivation and function
Published in
NeuroImage: Clinical, January 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.nicl.2015.08.001
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karuna Subramaniam, Christine I. Hooker, Bruno Biagianti, Melissa Fisher, Srikantan Nagarajan, Sophia Vinogradov

Abstract

Amotivation in schizophrenia is a central predictor of poor functioning, and is thought to occur due to deficits in anticipating future rewards, suggesting that impairments in anticipating pleasure can contribute to functional disability in schizophrenia. In healthy comparison (HC) participants, reward anticipation is associated with activity in frontal-striatal networks. By contrast, schizophrenia (SZ) participants show hypoactivation within these frontal-striatal networks during this motivated anticipatory brain state. Here, we examined neural activation in SZ and HC participants during the anticipatory phase of stimuli that predicted immediate upcoming reward and punishment, and during the feedback/outcome phase, in relation to trait measures of hedonic pleasure and real-world functional capacity. SZ patients showed hypoactivation in ventral striatum during reward anticipation. Additionally, we found distinct differences between HC and SZ groups in their association between reward-related immediate anticipatory neural activity and their reported experience of pleasure. HC participants recruited reward-related regions in striatum that significantly correlated with subjective consummatory pleasure, while SZ patients revealed activation in attention-related regions, such as the IPL, which correlated with consummatory pleasure and functional capacity. These findings may suggest that SZ patients activate compensatory attention processes during anticipation of immediate upcoming rewards, which likely contribute to their functional capacity in daily life.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sweden 1 2%
Unknown 62 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 21%
Student > Bachelor 9 14%
Student > Master 8 13%
Researcher 8 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Other 13 21%
Unknown 7 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 15 24%
Neuroscience 10 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 18 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 April 2016.
All research outputs
#8,424,617
of 13,445,103 outputs
Outputs from NeuroImage: Clinical
#989
of 1,464 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,414
of 239,781 outputs
Outputs of similar age from NeuroImage: Clinical
#8
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,445,103 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,464 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 239,781 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.