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Intrapancreatic bile duct metastasis from colon cancer after resection of liver metastasis with intrabiliary growth: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in World Journal of Surgical Oncology, January 2015
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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12 Mendeley
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Title
Intrapancreatic bile duct metastasis from colon cancer after resection of liver metastasis with intrabiliary growth: a case report
Published in
World Journal of Surgical Oncology, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12957-015-0676-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shoji Kawakatsu, Yuji Kaneoka, Atsuyuki Maeda, Yuichi Takayama, Yasuyuki Fukami, Shunsuke Onoe, Kawakatsu, Shoji, Kaneoka, Yuji, Maeda, Atsuyuki, Takayama, Yuichi, Fukami, Yasuyuki, Onoe, Shunsuke

Abstract

An extremely rare case of intrapancreatic bile duct metastasis from sigmoid colon adenocarcinoma is herein presented. Sigmoid colon cancer (T3, N0, M0, stage IIA) had been diagnosed and treated by sigmoidectomy in October 1993. In December 2002, a liver metastasis with intrabiliary growth was found, and this was treated by extended right hepatic lobectomy and caudate lobectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection. In February 2014, intrapancreatic bile duct metastasis was found, and this was treated by subtotal stomach-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy. The intrapancreatic metastasis was judged to have arisen from cancer cell implantation, either by spontaneous shedding of cancer cells or as a complication of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage. Twelve months have passed since the last surgical intervention, and there has been no sign of local recurrence or distant metastasis. Differential diagnosis between intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and intrabiliary growth of a liver metastasis originating from colorectal adenocarcinoma is difficult but very important for determining the therapeutic strategy. Careful examination is needed to diagnose intrahepatic biliary dilatation, especially for patients with a history of carcinoma in the digestive tract and even if years have passed since curative resection of the digestive tract cancer. Aggressive surgical management for localized recurrence of a hepatic metastasis from colorectal adenocarcinoma may improve patient survival.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 33%
Student > Bachelor 3 25%
Researcher 2 17%
Other 1 8%
Lecturer 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 83%
Unspecified 2 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 April 2016.
All research outputs
#3,944,051
of 7,625,034 outputs
Outputs from World Journal of Surgical Oncology
#312
of 1,213 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,404
of 227,541 outputs
Outputs of similar age from World Journal of Surgical Oncology
#12
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,625,034 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,213 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 227,541 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.