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Preterm birth among the hmong, other Asian subgroups and non-hispanic whites in California

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (74th percentile)

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6 tweeters
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46 Mendeley
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Title
Preterm birth among the hmong, other Asian subgroups and non-hispanic whites in California
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12884-015-0622-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zoua M. Vang, Irma T. Elo, Makoto Nagano

Abstract

We investigated very preterm (VPTB) and preterm birth (PTB) risk among Hmong women relative to non-Hispanic whites and other Asian subgroups. We also examined the maternal education health gradient across subgroups. California birth record data (2002-2004) were used to analyze 568,652 singleton births to white and Asian women. Pearson Chi-square and logistic regression were used to assess variation in maternal characteristics and VPTB/PTB risk by subgroup. White, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Asian Indian, and Vietnamese women had 36-59 % lower odds of VPTB and 30-56 % lower odds of PTB than Hmong women. Controls for covariates did not substantially diminish these disparities. Cambodian, Filipino and Lao/Thai women's odds of VPTB were similar to that of Hmong women. But they had higher adjusted odds of PTB compared to the Hmong. There was heterogeneity in the educational gradient of PTB, with significant differences between the least and most educated women among whites, Chinese, Japanese, Asian Indians, Cambodians, and Laoians/Thais. Maternal education was not associated with PTB for Hmong, Vietnamese and Korean women, however. Studies of Hmong infant health from the 1980s, the decade immediately following the group's mass migration to the US, found no significant differences in adverse birth outcomes between Hmong and white women. By the early 2000s, however, the disparities in VPTB and PTB between Hmong and white women, as well as between Hmong and other Asian women had become substantial. Moreover, despite gains in post-secondary education among childbearing-age Hmong women, the returns to education for the Hmong are negligible. Higher educational attainment does not confer the same health benefits for Hmong women as it does for whites and other Asian subgroups.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ecuador 1 2%
Unknown 45 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 28%
Researcher 9 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Student > Postgraduate 4 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 37%
Social Sciences 7 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 7 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 March 2016.
All research outputs
#2,606,927
of 11,322,951 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#719
of 1,980 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#56,576
of 237,020 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#21
of 82 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,322,951 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,980 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,020 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 82 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.