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Effectiveness of the prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on cognitive profiles in depression, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease: A systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, January 2019
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
98 Mendeley
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Title
Effectiveness of the prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on cognitive profiles in depression, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease: A systematic review
Published in
Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, January 2019
DOI 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2018.06.014
Pubmed ID
Authors

Takashi Iimori, Shinichiro Nakajima, Takahiro Miyazaki, Ryosuke Tarumi, Kamiyu Ogyu, Masataka Wada, Sakiko Tsugawa, Fumi Masuda, Zafiris J. Daskalakis, Daniel M. Blumberger, Masaru Mimura, Yoshihiro Noda

Abstract

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an effective clinical intervention for various neuropsychiatric diseases. However, it is still unclear whether rTMS has an effect on cognitive functioning. In this review, we aimed to systematically evaluate the cognitive effects of rTMS in depression, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease. We searched PubMed (1996-2018) under the set terms to review randomized controlled trials (RCT) to examine the effectiveness of rTMS administered to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and evaluated cognitive functions in patients with depression, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease. Two authors reviewed each article and came to consensus on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. All eligible studies were reviewed, duplicates were removed, and data were extracted individually. The search identified 579 articles, 31 of which met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Among them, 15 were conducted in patients with depression, 11 in patients with schizophrenia, and 5 in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Specifically, 6 studies demonstrated a significant improvement of executive function across these diseases. Further, no evidence for cognitive adverse effects was found in these included rTMS studies. Although the heterogeneity between studies in terms of cognitive measures applied, stimulation parameters, and participants limits the ability to generalize conclusions, this review demonstrated that prefrontal rTMS could exert pro-cognitive effects on executive function and attention in some patients with depression but inconsistent cognitive impacts in any of the examined domains especially in patients with schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. The results warrant further rTMS studies that include systematic assessment of cognition across various neuropsychiatric diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 98 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 26 27%
Student > Master 15 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 14%
Student > Bachelor 9 9%
Researcher 8 8%
Other 26 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 31 32%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 21%
Psychology 14 14%
Neuroscience 14 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 3%
Other 15 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 January 2019.
All research outputs
#1,384,105
of 13,613,268 outputs
Outputs from Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry
#148
of 1,770 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,443
of 268,092 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry
#9
of 76 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,613,268 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,770 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,092 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 76 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.