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Timing of access to secondary healthcare services and lower extremity amputations in patients with diabetes: a case–control study

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care, August 2015
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Title
Timing of access to secondary healthcare services and lower extremity amputations in patients with diabetes: a case–control study
Published in
BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care, August 2015
DOI 10.1136/bmjdrc-2014-000069
Pubmed ID
Authors

Claire M Buckley, Fauzi Ali, Graham A Roberts, Patricia M Kearney, Ivan J Perry, Colin P Bradley

Abstract

To investigate the association between timing of patient access to secondary healthcare services for diabetes management and lower extremity amputation (LEA) among patients with diabetes. A case-control study was conducted in the secondary healthcare system in Ireland. Cases were 116 patients with diabetes who underwent a first major non-traumatic LEA between 2006 and 2012. Controls were 348 patients with diabetes, over 45 years, admitted to the same hospital as an emergency or electively, frequency-matched for gender, type of diabetes, and year. Data were collected for 7 years prior to the event year. ORs for LEA in patients with diabetes comparing early versus late referral from primary to secondary healthcare were calculated. Statistically significant risk factors associated with LEA in patients with diabetes included being single, chronic kidney disease, hypertension, and hyperglycemia. Documented retinopathy was a significant protective factor. In unconditional logistic regression analysis adjusted for potential confounders, there was no evidence of a reduced risk of LEA among patients referred earlier to secondary healthcare for diabetes management. Specialist referral may need to occur earlier than the 7-year cut-off used to demonstrate an effect on reducing LEA risk. Documented retinopathy was associated with reduced risk of LEA, most likely as a proxy for better self-care. Variation in the management of diabetes in primary care may also be impacting on outcomes. Efforts to develop more integrated care between primary and secondary services may be beneficial, rather than focusing on timing of referral to secondary healthcare.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 17%
Other 5 11%
Researcher 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 4%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 11 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 32%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 19%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 4%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 14 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 August 2015.
All research outputs
#10,026,319
of 12,530,482 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care
#253
of 288 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#163,843
of 238,471 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care
#18
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,530,482 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 288 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,471 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.