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Effects of changing climate on aquatic habitat and connectivity for remnant populations of a wide‐ranging frog species in an arid landscape

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology and Evolution, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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12 Dimensions

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82 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of changing climate on aquatic habitat and connectivity for remnant populations of a wide‐ranging frog species in an arid landscape
Published in
Ecology and Evolution, October 2015
DOI 10.1002/ece3.1634
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pilliod, David S, Arkle, Robert S, Robertson, Jeanne M, Murphy, Melanie A, Funk, W Chris, Pilliod, David S., Arkle, Robert S., Robertson, Jeanne M., Murphy, Melanie A., Funk, W. Chris

Abstract

Amphibian species persisting in isolated streams and wetlands in desert environments can be susceptible to low connectivity, genetic isolation, and climate changes. We evaluated the past (1900-1930), recent (1981-2010), and future (2071-2100) climate suitability of the arid Great Basin (USA) for the Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris) and assessed whether changes in surface water may affect connectivity for remaining populations. We developed a predictive model of current climate suitability and used it to predict the historic and future distribution of suitable climates. We then modeled changes in surface water availability at each time period. Finally, we quantified connectivity among existing populations on the basis of hydrology and correlated it with interpopulation genetic distance. We found that the area of the Great Basin with suitable climate conditions has declined by approximately 49% over the last century and will likely continue to decline under future climate scenarios. Climate conditions at currently occupied locations have been relatively stable over the last century, which may explain persistence at these sites. However, future climates at these currently occupied locations are predicted to become warmer throughout the year and drier during the frog's activity period (May - September). Fall and winter precipitation may increase, but as rain instead of snow. Earlier runoff and lower summer base flows may reduce connectivity between neighboring populations, which is already limited. Many of these changes could have negative effects on remaining populations over the next 50-80 years, but milder winters, longer growing seasons, and wetter falls might positively affect survival and dispersal. Collectively, however, seasonal shifts in temperature, precipitation, and stream flow patterns could reduce habitat suitability and connectivity for frogs and possibly other aquatic species inhabiting streams in this arid region.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 82 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Australia 1 1%
France 1 1%
Mexico 1 1%
Portugal 1 1%
Unknown 76 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 34%
Student > Master 19 23%
Researcher 8 10%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 15 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 46 56%
Environmental Science 24 29%
Unspecified 6 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 2%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 2%
Other 2 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 September 2015.
All research outputs
#2,346,281
of 6,451,216 outputs
Outputs from Ecology and Evolution
#656
of 1,329 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73,673
of 197,980 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology and Evolution
#47
of 99 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,451,216 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 63rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,329 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 197,980 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 99 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.