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Workers compensation-reported injuries among security and law enforcement personnel in the private versus public sectors

Overview of attention for article published in Injury Epidemiology, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

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13 Mendeley
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Title
Workers compensation-reported injuries among security and law enforcement personnel in the private versus public sectors
Published in
Injury Epidemiology, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40621-018-0156-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

W. S. Witt, T. L. Bunn, S. Slavova

Abstract

Private and Public security and law enforcement (SLE) sectors perform multiple overlapping job duties. Workers' compensation (WC) SLE first reports of injury (FROI) data (2005-2015) were analyzed to describe injuries, identify differences in awarded WC benefits, and compare the probability of a FROI resulting in awarded benefits between Public and Private SLE. A Pearson's chi-square test was utilized and reverse selection logistic regression was performed to estimate the odds ratio that a FROI would result in an awarded benefit for Private vs. Public SLE, while adjusting for relevant covariates. Private SLE had higher FROI percentages for younger and for older workers, fall injuries, and back injuries, compared to Public SLE. The adjusted odds that a FROI resulted in an awarded benefit was 1.4 times higher for Private SLE compared to Public SLE; (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.09,1.69). Middle-aged SLE employee adjusted odds of awarded benefits was 3.3 times (95% CI [1.96, 5.39]) higher compared to younger employees. Adjusted odds of awarded benefits was 3.8 times (95% CI [1.34, 10.61]) higher for gunshots and 1.7 times (95% CI [1.22, 2.39]) higher for fractures/dislocations compared to other nature of injuries. Motor vehicle injury, fall/slip, and strain related FROIs had elevated adjusted odds of awarded benefits compared to other injury causes. Results highlight the importance of injury prevention education and worker safety training for Private and Public SLE sector workers on fall prevention (especially in Private SLE) and strain prevention (especially in Public SLE), as well as motor vehicle safety.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 23%
Researcher 2 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 2 15%
Psychology 2 15%
Engineering 1 8%
Unknown 8 62%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 April 2019.
All research outputs
#2,340,968
of 14,747,541 outputs
Outputs from Injury Epidemiology
#85
of 174 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,096
of 273,322 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Injury Epidemiology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,747,541 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 174 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 41.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,322 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them