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Developing a best practice pathway to support improvements in Indigenous Australians’ mental health and well-being: a qualitative study: Figure 1

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Open, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
155 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Developing a best practice pathway to support improvements in Indigenous Australians’ mental health and well-being: a qualitative study: Figure 1
Published in
BMJ Open, August 2015
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-007938
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rachael Hinton, David J Kavanagh, Lesley Barclay, Richard Chenhall, Tricia Nagel

Abstract

There is a need to adapt pathways to care to promote access to mental health services for Indigenous people in Australia. This study explored Indigenous community and service provider perspectives of well-being and ways to promote access to care for Indigenous people at risk of depressive illness. A participatory action research framework was used to inform the development of an agreed early intervention pathway; thematic analysis 2 remote communities in the Northern Territory. Using snowball and purposive sampling, 27 service providers and community members with knowledge of the local context and the diverse needs of those at risk of depression were interviewed. 30% of participants were Indigenous. The proposed pathway to care was adapted in response to participant feedback. The study found that Indigenous mental health and well-being is perceived as multifaceted and strongly linked to cultural identity. It also confirms that there is broad support for promotion of a clear pathway to early intervention. Key identified components of this pathway were the health centre, visiting and community-based services, and local community resources including elders, cultural activities and families. Enablers to early intervention were reported. Significant barriers to the detection and treatment of those at risk of depression were identified, including insufficient resources, negative attitudes and stigma, and limited awareness of support options. Successful early intervention for well-being concerns requires improved understanding of Indigenous well-being perspectives and a systematic change in service delivery that promotes integration, flexibility and collaboration between services and the community, and recognises the importance of social determinants in health promotion and the healing process. Such changes require policy support, targeted training and education, and ongoing promotion.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 155 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 154 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 33 21%
Researcher 25 16%
Student > Bachelor 16 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 8%
Other 31 20%
Unknown 22 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 36 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 25 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 24 15%
Social Sciences 21 14%
Environmental Science 4 3%
Other 16 10%
Unknown 29 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 July 2019.
All research outputs
#5,233,247
of 17,358,590 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Open
#8,512
of 16,260 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,351
of 244,838 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Open
#157
of 301 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,358,590 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 16,260 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.9. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 244,838 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 301 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.