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App use, physical activity and healthy lifestyle: a cross sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
twitter
44 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
56 Dimensions

Readers on

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262 Mendeley
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Title
App use, physical activity and healthy lifestyle: a cross sectional study
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2165-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joan Martine Dallinga, Matthijs Mennes, Laurence Alpay, Harmen Bijwaard, Marije Baart de la Faille-Deutekom

Abstract

Physical inactivity is a growing public health concern. Use of mobile applications (apps) may be a powerful tool to encourage physical activity and a healthy lifestyle. For instance, apps may be used in the preparation of a running event. However, there is little evidence for the relationship between app use and change in physical activity and health in recreational runners. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the use of apps and changes in physical activity, health and lifestyle behaviour, and self-image of short and long distance runners. A cross sectional study was designed. A random selection of 15,000 runners (of 54,000 participants) of a 16 and 6.4 km recreational run (Dam tot Damloop) in the Netherlands was invited to participate in an online survey two days after the run. Anthropometrics, app use, activity level, preparation for running event, running physical activity (RPA), health and lifestyle, and self-image were addressed. A chi-squared test was conducted to analyse differences between app users and non-app users in baseline characteristics as well as in RPA, healthy lifestyle and perceived health. In addition, a multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine if app use could predict RPA, perceived health and lifestyle, and self-image. Of the 15,000 invited runners, 28 % responded. For both distances, app use was positively related to RPA and feeling healthier (p < 0.05). Also, app use was positively related to feeling better about themselves, feeling like an athlete, motivating others to participate in running, and losing weight (p < 0.01). Furthermore, for 16 km runners app use was positively related to eating healthier, feeling more energetic and reporting a higher chance to maintain sport behaviour (p < 0.05). These results suggest that use of mobile apps has a beneficial role in the preparation of a running event, as it promotes health and physical activity. Further research is now needed to determine a causal relationship between app use and physical and health related behaviour.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 44 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 262 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Unknown 259 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 46 18%
Student > Bachelor 46 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 42 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 6%
Student > Postgraduate 14 5%
Other 39 15%
Unknown 60 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 35 13%
Sports and Recreations 27 10%
Computer Science 25 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 8%
Psychology 21 8%
Other 52 20%
Unknown 80 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 96. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 July 2018.
All research outputs
#362,982
of 22,514,578 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#315
of 14,608 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,785
of 255,202 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,514,578 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,608 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,202 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them