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20 Years of Air–Water Gas Exchange Observations for Pesticides in the Western Arctic Ocean

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, August 2015
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Title
20 Years of Air–Water Gas Exchange Observations for Pesticides in the Western Arctic Ocean
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, August 2015
DOI 10.1021/acs.est.5b01303
Pubmed ID
Authors

Liisa M. Jantunen, Fiona Wong, Anya Gawor, Henrik Kylin, Paul A. Helm, Gary A. Stern, William M. J. Strachan, Deborah A. Burniston, Terry F. Bidleman

Abstract

The arctic has been contaminated by legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and currently used pesticides (CUPs) through atmospheric transport and oceanic currents. Here we report time trends and air-water exchange of OCPs and CUPs from research expeditions conducted between 1993-2013. Compounds determined in both air and water were trans- and cis-chlordanes (TC, CC), trans- and cis-nonachlors (TN, CN), heptachlor exo-epoxide (HEPX), dieldrin (DIEL), chlorobornanes (ΣCHBs, toxaphene), dacthal (DAC), endosulfans and metabolite endosulfan sulfate (ENDO-I, ENDO-II, ENDO SUL), chlorothalonil (CHT), chlorpyrifos (CPF) and trifluralin (TFN). Pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB, quintozene) and its soil metabolite pentachlorothianisole (PCTA) were also found in air. Concentrations of most OCPs declined in surface water, whereas some CUPs increased (ENDO-I, CHT and TFN) or showed no significant change (CPF, DAC), while most compounds declined in air. Chlordane compound fractions TC/(TC+CC) and TC/(TC+CC+TN) decreased in water and air, while CC/(TC+CC+TN) and TN/(TC+CC+TN) increased, suggesting selective removal of more labile TC over time and/or a shift in chlordane sources. Water/air fugacity ratios indicated net volatilization (FR >1.0) or near equilibrium (FR not significantly different from 1.0) for most OCPs, but net deposition (FR <1.0) for ΣCHBs. Net deposition was shown for ENDO-I on all expeditions, while the net exchange direction of other CUPs varied. Understanding the processes and current state of air-surface exchange helps to interpret environmental exposure, evaluate the effectiveness of International Protocols and provides insights for the environmental fate of new and emerging chemicals.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 9%
Canada 2 6%
Unknown 28 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 39%
Unspecified 5 15%
Researcher 4 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 12%
Student > Master 3 9%
Other 4 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 13 39%
Unspecified 8 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 12%
Engineering 2 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 6%
Other 4 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 August 2015.
All research outputs
#10,911,787
of 12,313,065 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#11,803
of 12,334 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#201,571
of 245,243 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#246
of 265 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,313,065 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,334 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 265 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.