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Overexpression Of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-1beta Predicting Poor Prognosis Is Associated With Biliary Phenotype In Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, August 2015
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1 tweeter

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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6 Mendeley
Title
Overexpression Of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-1beta Predicting Poor Prognosis Is Associated With Biliary Phenotype In Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Published in
Scientific Reports, August 2015
DOI 10.1038/srep13319
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dan-Dan Yu, Ying-Ying Jing, Shi-Wei Guo, Fei Ye, Wen Lu, Quan Li, Yu-Long Dong, Lu Gao, Yu-Ting Yang, Yang, Meng-Chao Wu, Li-Xin Wei

Abstract

Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1beta (HNF-1B) is involved in the hepatobiliary specification of hepatoblasts to cholangiocytes during liver development, and is strongly expressed throughout adult biliary epithelium. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of HNF-1B in different pathologic subtypes of primary liver cancer, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), and the relationship between HNF-1B expression, clinicopathological features and prognosis. We retrospectively investigated 2 cohorts of patients, including 183 HCCs and 69 ICCs. The expression of HNF-1B was examined by immunohistochemistry. We found that HNF-1B expression was associated with pathological subtype of primary tumor, and HNF-1B expression in HCC tissue may be associated with the change of phenotype on recurrence. The HNF-1B expression was positively correlated with biliary/HPC (hepatic progenitor cell) markers expression. Further, multivariable analysis showed that HNF-1B expression was an independent prognostic factor for both overall survival and disease-free survival of HCC patients. However, no correlation between HNF-1B expression and survival was found in ICC patients. In summary, HCC with high HNF-1B expression displayed biliary phenotype and tended to show poorer prognosis. HNF-1B-positive malignant cells could be bipotential cells and give rise to both hepatocytic and cholangiocytic lineages during tumorigenesis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 1 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 17%
Librarian 1 17%
Unspecified 1 17%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 17%
Computer Science 1 17%
Unspecified 1 17%
Unknown 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2015.
All research outputs
#2,945,261
of 5,560,729 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#11,761
of 20,310 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,632
of 194,919 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#973
of 1,703 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,560,729 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 20,310 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.8. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,919 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,703 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.