↓ Skip to main content

Deep coverage whole genome sequences and plasma lipoprotein(a) in individuals of European and African ancestries

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, July 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
68 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
50 Mendeley
Title
Deep coverage whole genome sequences and plasma lipoprotein(a) in individuals of European and African ancestries
Published in
Nature Communications, July 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41467-018-04668-w
Pubmed ID
Authors

Seyedeh M. Zekavat, Sanni Ruotsalainen, Robert E. Handsaker, Maris Alver, Jonathan Bloom, Timothy Poterba, Cotton Seed, Jason Ernst, Mark Chaffin, Jesse Engreitz, Gina M. Peloso, Ani Manichaikul, Chaojie Yang, Kathleen A. Ryan, Mao Fu, W. Craig Johnson, Michael Tsai, Matthew Budoff, Ramachandran S. Vasan, L. Adrienne Cupples, Jerome I. Rotter, Stephen S. Rich, Wendy Post, Braxton D. Mitchell, Adolfo Correa, Andres Metspalu, James G. Wilson, Veikko Salomaa, Manolis Kellis, Mark J. Daly, Benjamin M. Neale, Steven McCarroll, Ida Surakka, Tonu Esko, Andrea Ganna, Samuli Ripatti, Sekar Kathiresan, Pradeep Natarajan

Abstract

Lipoprotein(a), Lp(a), is a modified low-density lipoprotein particle that contains apolipoprotein(a), encoded by LPA, and is a highly heritable, causal risk factor for cardiovascular diseases that varies in concentrations across ancestries. Here, we use deep-coverage whole genome sequencing in 8392 individuals of European and African ancestry to discover and interpret both single-nucleotide variants and copy number (CN) variation associated with Lp(a). We observe that genetic determinants between Europeans and Africans have several unique determinants. The common variant rs12740374 associated with Lp(a) cholesterol is an eQTL for SORT1 and independent of LDL cholesterol. Observed associations of aggregates of rare non-coding variants are largely explained by LPA structural variation, namely the LPA kringle IV 2 (KIV2)-CN. Finally, we find that LPA risk genotypes confer greater relative risk for incident atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases compared to directly measured Lp(a), and are significantly associated with measures of subclinical atherosclerosis in African Americans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 68 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 50 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 32%
Unspecified 7 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Professor 4 8%
Other 11 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 13 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 10%
Computer Science 4 8%
Other 5 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 38. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 September 2019.
All research outputs
#451,598
of 13,594,282 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#7,348
of 24,614 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,510
of 266,726 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#1
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,594,282 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 24,614 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,726 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them