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The role of activation-induced cytidine deaminase in antibody diversification, immunodeficiency, and B-cell malignancies

Overview of attention for article published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, October 2004
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
50 Mendeley
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Title
The role of activation-induced cytidine deaminase in antibody diversification, immunodeficiency, and B-cell malignancies
Published in
The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, October 2004
DOI 10.1016/j.jaci.2004.07.049
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zhonghui Luo, Diana Ronai, Matthew D. Scharff

Abstract

Before exposure to antigen, antibodies with a wide diversity of antigen-binding sites are created by V(D)J rearrangement. After exposure to antigen, further diversification is accomplished by means of somatic hypermutation of the antibody variable region genes and class-switch recombination between the heavy-chain mu constant region and the downstream gamma, epsilon, and alpha constant region. The variable region mutations are responsible for the affinity maturation of the antibody response, whereas class-switch recombination enables the antibodies to be distributed throughout the body and to carry out different effector functions. Both somatic mutation and class switching require an enzyme called activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) that converts deoxycytidines to deoxyuracils on single-stranded DNA. Genetic defects of AID in human subjects result in hyper-IgM syndrome type 2. The analysis of both mutant mice and immunodeficient patients has led to a better understanding of the mechanism of action and role of AID in immunity, as well as in the malignant transformation of B cells.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 2%
Ireland 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 47 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 22%
Student > Master 6 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Other 4 8%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 5 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 50%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 16%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 8%
Chemistry 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2015.
All research outputs
#3,489,345
of 12,193,506 outputs
Outputs from The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
#3,544
of 7,404 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73,652
of 240,825 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
#72
of 106 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,193,506 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,404 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.9. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,825 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 106 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.