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The re-emergency and persistence of vaccine preventable diseases

Overview of attention for article published in Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências, August 2015
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Title
The re-emergency and persistence of vaccine preventable diseases
Published in
Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências, August 2015
DOI 10.1590/0001-3765201520140663
Pubmed ID
Authors

RODRIGO C.N. BORBA, VINÍCIUS M. VIDAL, LILIAN O. MOREIRA

Abstract

The introduction of vaccination worldwide dramatically reduced the incidence of pathogenic bacterial and viral diseases. Despite the highly successful vaccination strategies, the number of cases among vaccine preventable diseases has increased in the last decade and several of those diseases are still endemic in different countries. Here we discuss some epidemiological aspects and possible arguments that may explain why ancient diseases such as, measles, polio, pertussis, diphtheria and tuberculosis are still with us.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 76 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 19%
Student > Bachelor 13 17%
Researcher 10 13%
Student > Postgraduate 6 8%
Other 5 6%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 14 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 30%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 3%
Other 10 13%
Unknown 17 22%