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The effects of physical vibration on heart rate variability as a measure of drowsiness

Overview of attention for article published in Ergonomics, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 1,816)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
27 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
63 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
47 Mendeley
Title
The effects of physical vibration on heart rate variability as a measure of drowsiness
Published in
Ergonomics, July 2018
DOI 10.1080/00140139.2018.1482373
Pubmed ID
Authors

N. Zhang, M. Fard, M. H. U. Bhuiyan, D. Verhagen, M. F. Azari, S. R. Robinson

Abstract

We investigated the effects of low frequency whole body vibration on heart rate variability (HRV), a measure of autonomic nervous system activation that differentiates between stress and drowsiness. Fifteen participants underwent two simulated driving tasks for 60 minutes each: one involved whole-body 4-7 Hz vibration delivered through the car seat, and one involved no vibration. The Karolinska Sleepiness Scale, a subjective measure of drowsiness, demonstrated a significant increase in drowsiness during the task. Within 15-30 minutes of exposure to vibration, autonomic (sympathetic) activity increased (p < 0.01) in response to the stress of maintaining alertness and performance when drowsy, and peaked at 60 minutes (p < 0.001). Changes in three other HRV domains (higher LF/HF ratios, lower RMSSD (ms), and pNN50 (%) values) were consistent with increased sympathetic activation. These findings have implications for the future development of equivalent drowsiness contours leading to improvements in road safety. Practitioner Summary: The effects of physical vibration on driver drowsiness have not been well investigated. This laboratory-controlled study found characteristic changes in heart rate variability (HRV) domains that indicated progressively increasing neurological effort in maintaining alertness in response to low frequency vibration, which became significant within 30 minutes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 63 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 15%
Student > Master 6 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 4%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 9 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 13 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 11%
Psychology 4 9%
Computer Science 3 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 12 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 308. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 August 2020.
All research outputs
#50,296
of 15,657,990 outputs
Outputs from Ergonomics
#4
of 1,816 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,865
of 276,637 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ergonomics
#2
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,657,990 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,816 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,637 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.