↓ Skip to main content

Surfactant therapy for bronchiolitis in critically ill infants

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, August 2015
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
107 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Surfactant therapy for bronchiolitis in critically ill infants
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, August 2015
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd009194.pub3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kana R Jat, Deepak Chawla

Abstract

Bronchiolitis is one of the most frequent causes of respiratory failure in infants; some infants will require intensive care and mechanical ventilation. There is lack of evidence regarding effective treatment for bronchiolitis other than supportive care. Abnormalities of surfactant quantity or quality (or both) have been observed in severe cases of bronchiolitis. Exogenous surfactant administration appears to favourably change the haemodynamics of the lungs and may be a potentially promising therapy for severe bronchiolitis. This is an update of a review published in Issue 9, 2012. We did not identify any new studies for inclusion, and our conclusions remain unchanged. To evaluate the efficacy of exogenous surfactant administration (i.e. intratracheal administration of surfactant of any type (whether animal-derived or synthetic), at any dose and at any time after start of ventilation) compared to placebo, no intervention or standard care in reducing mortality and the duration of ventilation in infants and children with bronchiolitis requiring mechanical ventilation. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Studies (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 5) which contains the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infections Group's Specialised Register; MEDLINE (1948 to June week 3, 2015); EMBASE (1974 to June 2015); CINAHL (1982 to June 2015); LILACS (1985 to June 2015); and Web of Science (1985 to June 2015). We considered prospective, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs evaluating the effect of exogenous surfactant in infants and children with bronchiolitis requiring mechanical ventilation. Two review authors selected studies independently. We extracted the data using a predefined proforma, independently analysed the data, and performed meta-analyses. We included three small RCTs enrolling 79 participants. Two trials did not use a placebo in the control arms and the third trial used air placebo. Two included studies reported no mortality. We judged all three of the included studies to be at low risk or unclear risk across all risk of bias categories; we did not judge any of the studies to be at high risk of bias in any category. Our pooled analysis of the three trials revealed that duration of mechanical ventilation was not significantly different between the groups (mean difference (MD) -63.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) -130.43 to 4.35 hours) but duration of intensive care unit (ICU) stay was less in the surfactant group compared to the control group: MD -3.31, 95% CI -6.38 to -0.25 days. After excluding one trial which produced significant heterogeneity, the duration of mechanical ventilation and duration of ICU stay were significantly lower in the surfactant group compared to the control group: MD -28.99, 95% CI -40.10 to -17.87 hours; and MD -1.81, 95% CI -2.42 to -1.19 days, respectively. Use of surfactant had favourable effects on oxygenation and CO2 elimination. No adverse effects and no complications were observed in any of the three included studies. The level of evidence for duration of mechanical ventilation, duration of intensive care unit stay, oxygenation parameters, and carbon dioxide parameters was of moderate quality. Use of surfactant had favourable effects on duration of mechanical ventilation, duration of ICU stay, oxygenation, and CO2 elimination. However, the studies are few and small (n = 79) so available evidence is insufficient to establish the effectiveness of surfactant therapy for bronchiolitis in critically ill infants who require mechanical ventilation. There is a need for larger trials with adequate power and a cost-effectiveness analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of exogenous surfactant therapy for infants with bronchiolitis who require intensive care management.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 2 2%
United States 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Peru 1 <1%
Unknown 101 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 19%
Student > Bachelor 13 12%
Researcher 12 11%
Student > Postgraduate 11 10%
Unspecified 8 7%
Other 42 39%
Unknown 1 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 70 65%
Unspecified 11 10%
Social Sciences 5 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 5%
Psychology 5 5%
Other 10 9%
Unknown 1 <1%