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The roles of neutrophil serine proteinases in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, July 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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6 Mendeley
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Title
The roles of neutrophil serine proteinases in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13075-018-1632-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Siming Gao, Xiaoxia Zuo, Di Liu, Yizhi Xiao, Honglin Zhu, Huali Zhang, Hui Luo

Abstract

Dermatomyositis and polymyositis are the best known idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs). Classic histopathologic findings include the infiltration of inflammatory cells into muscle tissues. Neutrophil serine proteinases (NSPs) are granule-associated enzymes and play roles in inflammatory cell migration by increasing the permeability of vascular endothelial cells. In this study, we aimed to find the roles of NSPs in pathogenesis of IIMs. RNA and DNA were isolated to measure the relative expression of NSPs and their methylation levels. The expression of NSPs in serum and muscle tissues was tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence, respectively. Serum from patients was used to culture the human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs), and then we observed the influence of serum on expression of VE-cadherin, endothelial cell tube formation, and transendothelial migration of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We found that the expression of NSPs was increased in PBMCs, serum, and muscle tissues of IIM patients; these NSPs were hypomethylated in the PBMCs of patients. Serum NSPs were positively correlated with clinical indicators of IIM patients, including lactic dehydrogenase, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin M, and immunoglobulin A. Patients with anti-Jo-1, with anti-Ro-52, or without interstitial lung disease had lower levels of proteinase 3. Serum NSPs degraded the VE-cadherin of HDMECs, and serum NSP application increased the permeability of HDMECs. Our studies indicate, for the first time, that NSPs play an important role in muscle inflammatory cell infiltration by increasing the permeability of vascular endothelial cells in IIM patients.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 2 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 17%
Unspecified 1 17%
Student > Master 1 17%
Unknown 1 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 50%
Neuroscience 1 17%
Unspecified 1 17%
Unknown 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 July 2018.
All research outputs
#2,111,186
of 13,183,063 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#548
of 2,144 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,262
of 268,027 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,183,063 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,144 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,027 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them