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Pain as a risk factor for substance use: a qualitative study of people who use drugs in British Columbia, Canada

Overview of attention for article published in Harm Reduction Journal, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
36 Mendeley
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Title
Pain as a risk factor for substance use: a qualitative study of people who use drugs in British Columbia, Canada
Published in
Harm Reduction Journal, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12954-018-0241-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pauline Voon, Alissa M. Greer, Ashraf Amlani, Cheri Newman, Charlene Burmeister, Jane A. Buxton

Abstract

People who use drugs have a significantly higher prevalence of chronic non-cancer pain compared to the general population, yet little is known about how various policy, economic, physical, and social environments may serve as risk or protective factors in the context of concurrent pain and substance use. Therefore, this study sought to explore perspectives, risks, and harms associated with pain among people who use drugs. Thirteen focus group interviews were held across British Columbia, Canada, from July to September 2015. In total, 83 people who had lived experience with substance use participated in the study. Using an interpretive description approach, themes were conceptualized according to the Rhodes' Risk Environment and patient-centered care frameworks. Participants described how their experiences with inadequately managed pain in various policy, economic, physical, and social environments reinforced marginalization, such as restrictive policies, economic vulnerability, lack of access to socio-physical support systems, stigma from health professionals, and denial of pain medication leading to risky self-medication. Principles of patient-centered care were often not upheld, from a lack of recognition of patients as experts in understanding their unique pain needs and experiences, to an absence of shared power and decision-making, which often resulted in distrust of the patient-provider relationship. Various risk environments and non-patient-centered interactions may contribute to an array of health and social harms in the context of inadequately managed pain among people who use drugs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 22%
Student > Master 7 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Other 4 11%
Researcher 3 8%
Other 6 17%
Unknown 3 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 33%
Psychology 8 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 8%
Social Sciences 3 8%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 3 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 February 2019.
All research outputs
#7,238,160
of 14,291,740 outputs
Outputs from Harm Reduction Journal
#445
of 553 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,071
of 273,275 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Harm Reduction Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,291,740 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 553 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.3. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,275 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them