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Effects of urban stormwater and iron-enhanced sand filtration onDaphnia magnaandPimephales promelas

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, August 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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28 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of urban stormwater and iron-enhanced sand filtration onDaphnia magnaandPimephales promelas
Published in
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, August 2018
DOI 10.1002/etc.4227
Pubmed ID
Authors

Benjamin M. Westerhoff, David J. Fairbairn, Mark L. Ferrey, Adriana Matilla, Jordan Kunkel, Sarah M. Elliott, Richard L. Kiesling, Dustin Woodruff, Heiko L. Schoenfuss

Abstract

Urban stormwater is an important but incompletely characterized contributor to surface-water toxicity. The present study used five bioassays of two model organisms (Daphnia magna and fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas) to investigate stormwater toxicity and mitigation by full-scale iron-enhanced sand filters (IESF). Stormwater samples were collected from major stormwater conveyances and full-scale IESFs during four seasonal events (winter snowmelt; and spring, early summer, and late summer rainfalls) and analyzed for a diverse range of contaminants of emerging concern including pharmaceuticals, personal care products, industrial chemicals, and pesticides. Concurrently, stormwater samples were collected for toxicity testing. Seasonality appeared more influential and consistent than site type for most bioassays. Typically, biological consequences were least in early summer and greatest in late summer and winter. In contrast with the unimproved and occasionally reduced biological outcomes in IESF-treated and late summer samples, water chemistry indicated that numbers and total concentrations of detected organic chemicals, metals, and nutrients were reduced in late summer and in IESF-treated stormwater samples. Some potent toxicants showed more specific seasonality [e.g., high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and industrial compounds in winter, pesticides in early summer and spring, flame retardants in late summer], which may have influenced outcomes. Potential explanations for insignificant or unexpected stormwater treatment outcomes include confounding effects of complex stormwater matrices, IESF nutrient removal, and - less likely - unmonitored toxicants. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 11%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Professor 2 7%
Other 5 18%
Unknown 8 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 5 18%
Engineering 3 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Chemistry 2 7%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 4%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 12 43%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 October 2018.
All research outputs
#7,165,022
of 13,649,061 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#2,237
of 3,934 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,866
of 267,654 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#18
of 70 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,649,061 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,934 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,654 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 70 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.