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The splenic injury outcomes trial: An American Association for the Surgery of Trauma multi-institutional study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, The, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
16 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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34 Dimensions

Readers on

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33 Mendeley
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Title
The splenic injury outcomes trial: An American Association for the Surgery of Trauma multi-institutional study
Published in
Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, The, September 2015
DOI 10.1097/ta.0000000000000782
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zarzaur, Ben L, Kozar, Rosemary, Myers, John G, Claridge, Jeffrey A, Scalea, Thomas M, Neideen, Todd A, Maung, Adrian A, Alarcon, Louis, Corcos, Alain, Kerwin, Andrew, Coimbra, Raul

Abstract

Delayed splenic hemorrhage after nonoperative management (NOM) of blunt splenic injury (BSI) is a feared complication, particularly in the outpatient setting. Significant resources, including angiography (ANGIO), are used in an effort to prevent delayed splenectomy (DS). No prospective, long-term data exist to determine the actual risk of splenectomy. The purposes of this trial were to ascertain the 180-day risk of splenectomy after 24 hours of NOM of BSI and to determine factors related to splenectomy. Eleven Level I trauma centers participated in this prospective observational study. Adult patients achieving 24 hours of NOM of their BSI were eligible. Patients were followed up for 180 days. Demographic, physiologic, radiographic, injury-related information, and spleen-related interventions were recorded. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were used to determine factors associated with DS. A total of 383 patients were enrolled. Twelve patients (3.1%) underwent in-hospital splenectomy between 24 hours and 9 days after injury. Of 366 discharged with a spleen, 1 (0.27%) required readmission for DS on postinjury Day 12. No Grade I injuries experienced DS. The splenectomy rate after 24 hours of NOM was 1.5 per 1,000 patient-days. Only extravasation from the spleen at time of admission (ADMIT-BLUSH) was associated with splenectomy (odds ratio, 3.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-12.4). Of patients with ADMIT-BLUSH (n = 49), 17 (34.7%) did not have ANGIO with embolization (EMBO), and 2 of those (11.8%) underwent splenectomy; 32 (65.3%) underwent ANGIO with EMBO, and 2 of those (6.3%, p = 0.6020 compared with no ANGIO with EMBO) required splenectomy. Splenectomy after 24 hours of NOM is rare. After the initial 24 hours, no additional interventions are warranted for patients with Grade I injuries. For Grades II to V, close observation as an inpatient or outpatient is indicated for 10 days to 14 days. ADMIT-BLUSH is a strong predictor of DS and should lead to close observation or earlier surgical intervention. Prognostic/epidemiological study, level III; therapeutic study, level IV.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 5 15%
Unspecified 3 9%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Professor 2 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 6%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 16 48%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 33%
Unspecified 3 9%
Neuroscience 1 3%
Computer Science 1 3%
Engineering 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 16 48%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 November 2015.
All research outputs
#1,055,776
of 9,258,730 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, The
#537
of 2,838 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,318
of 234,565 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, The
#36
of 129 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,258,730 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,838 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,565 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 129 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.