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Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) at ambient freshwater beaches

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Water & Health, December 2014
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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46 Mendeley
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Title
Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) at ambient freshwater beaches
Published in
Journal of Water & Health, December 2014
DOI 10.2166/wh.2014.278
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lisa R. Fogarty, Sheridan K. Haack, Heather E. Johnson, Angela K. Brennan, Natasha M. Isaacs, Chelsea Spencer

Abstract

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are a threat to human health worldwide, and although detected at marine beaches, they have been largely unstudied at freshwater beaches. Genes indicating S. aureus (SA; femA) and methicillin resistance (mecA) were detected at 11 and 12 of 13 US Great Lakes beaches and in 18% or 27% of 287 recreational water samples, respectively. Eight beaches had mecA + femA (potential MRSA) detections. During an intensive study, higher bather numbers, staphylococci concentrations, and femA detections were found in samples collected after noon than before noon. Local population density, beach cloud cover, and beach wave height were significantly correlated with SA or MRSA detection frequency. The Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene, associated with community-acquired MRSA, was detected in 12 out of 27 potential MRSA samples. The femA gene was detected less frequently at beaches that met US enterococci criteria or EU enterococci 'excellent' recreational water quality, but was not related to Escherichia coli-defined criteria. Escherichia coli is often the only indicator used to determine water quality at US beaches, given the economic and healthcare burden that can be associated with infections caused by SA and MRSA, monitoring of recreational waters for non-fecal bacteria such as staphylococci and/or SA may be warranted.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 24%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Other 3 7%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 8 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 7 15%
Environmental Science 6 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 9%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 10 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 December 2017.
All research outputs
#4,124,394
of 14,123,042 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Water & Health
#78
of 358 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#69,988
of 239,524 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Water & Health
#4
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,123,042 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 358 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 239,524 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.