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Disruption of maternal gut microbiota during gestation alters offspring microbiota and immunity

Overview of attention for article published in Microbiome, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
61 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
144 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Disruption of maternal gut microbiota during gestation alters offspring microbiota and immunity
Published in
Microbiome, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40168-018-0511-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Donald D. Nyangahu, Katie S. Lennard, Bryan P. Brown, Matthew G. Darby, Jerome M. Wendoh, Enock Havyarimana, Peter Smith, James Butcher, Alain Stintzi, Nicola Mulder, William Horsnell, Heather B. Jaspan

Abstract

Early life microbiota is an important determinant of immune and metabolic development and may have lasting consequences. The maternal gut microbiota during pregnancy or breastfeeding is important for defining infant gut microbiota. We hypothesized that maternal gut microbiota during pregnancy and breastfeeding is a critical determinant of infant immunity. To test this, pregnant BALB/c dams were fed vancomycin for 5 days prior to delivery (gestation; Mg), 14 days postpartum during nursing (Mn), or during gestation and nursing (Mgn), or no vancomycin (Mc). We analyzed adaptive immunity and gut microbiota in dams and pups at various times after delivery. In addition to direct alterations to maternal gut microbial composition, pup gut microbiota displayed lower α-diversity and distinct community clusters according to timing of maternal vancomycin. Vancomycin was undetectable in maternal and offspring sera, therefore the observed changes in the microbiota of stomach contents (as a proxy for breastmilk) and pup gut signify an indirect mechanism through which maternal intestinal microbiota influences extra-intestinal and neonatal commensal colonization. These effects on microbiota influenced both maternal and offspring immunity. Maternal immunity was altered, as demonstrated by significantly higher levels of both total IgG and IgM in Mgn and Mn breastmilk when compared to Mc. In pups, lymphocyte numbers in the spleens of Pg and Pn were significantly increased compared to Pc. This increase in cellularity was in part attributable to elevated numbers of both CD4+ T cells and B cells, most notable Follicular B cells. Our results indicate that perturbations to maternal gut microbiota dictate neonatal adaptive immunity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 61 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 144 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 144 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 21%
Student > Master 20 14%
Researcher 20 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 10%
Student > Postgraduate 8 6%
Other 21 15%
Unknown 30 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 20 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 18 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 8%
Other 18 13%
Unknown 38 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 48. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2020.
All research outputs
#505,678
of 16,651,312 outputs
Outputs from Microbiome
#139
of 965 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,516
of 280,018 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbiome
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,651,312 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 965 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,018 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them