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Development of novel multiplex microsatellite polymerase chain reactions to enable high-throughput population genetic studies of Schistosoma haematobium

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, August 2015
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Title
Development of novel multiplex microsatellite polymerase chain reactions to enable high-throughput population genetic studies of Schistosoma haematobium
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-1044-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

B. L. Webster, M. Rabone, T. Pennance, A. M. Emery, F. Allan, A. Gouvras, S. Knopp, A. Garba, A. A. Hamidou, K. A. Mohammed, S. M. Ame, D. Rollinson, J. P. Webster

Abstract

Human urogenital schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma haematobium is widely distributed across Africa and is increasingly targeted for control and regional elimination. The development of new high-throughput, cost-effective molecular tools and approaches are needed to monitor and evaluate the impact of control programs on the parasite populations. Microsatellite loci are genetic markers that can be used to investigate how parasite populations change over time and in relation to external influences such as control interventions. Here, 18 existing S. haematobium microsatellite loci were optimised to enable simultaneous amplification across two novel multiplex microsatellite PCR's, each containing nine loci. Methods were developed for the cost effective and rapid processing and microsatellite analysis of S. haematobium larval stages stored on Whatman-FTA cards and proved robust on miracidia and cercariae collected from Zanzibar and Niger. The development of these novel and robust multiplex microsatellite assays, in combination with an improved protocol to elute gDNA from Whatman-FTA fixed schistosome larval stages, enables the high-throughput population genetic analysis of S. haematobium. The molecular resources and protocols described here advance the way researchers can perform multi locus-based population genetic analyses of S. haematobium as part of the evaluation and monitoring of schistosomiasis control programmes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 25%
Student > Master 7 22%
Researcher 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Lecturer 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 7 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 8 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 September 2015.
All research outputs
#4,605,242
of 6,251,511 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,244
of 1,768 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#133,988
of 194,433 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#83
of 129 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,251,511 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,768 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 129 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.