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Temporal Variation in Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus Antibodies in Freshwater Drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) Indicates Cyclic Transmission in Lake Winnebago, Wisconsin

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Clinical Microbiology, September 2015
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Title
Temporal Variation in Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus Antibodies in Freshwater Drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) Indicates Cyclic Transmission in Lake Winnebago, Wisconsin
Published in
Journal of Clinical Microbiology, September 2015
DOI 10.1128/jcm.00010-15
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna Wilson-Rothering, Susan Marcquenski, Ryan Koenigs, Ronald Bruch, Kendall Kamke, Daniel Isermann, Andrew Thurman, Kathy Toohey-Kurth, Tony Goldberg

Abstract

Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is an emerging pathogen that causes mass mortality in multiple fish species. In 2007, the Great Lakes freshwater stain, Type IVb, caused a large die-off of freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) in Lake Winnebago, Wisconsin, USA. To evaluate the persistence and transmission of VHSV, freshwater drum from Lake Winnebago were tested for antibodies to the virus using recently developed virus neutralization (VN) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) assays. Samples were also tested by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) to detect viral RNA. Of 548 serum samples tested, 44 (8.03%) were positive by VN (titers ranging from 1:16 to 1:1024) and 45 (8.21%) were positive by ELISA, including seven fish positive by both assays. Antibody prevalence increased with age and was higher in one northwestern area of Lake Winnebago than in others. Of 3,864 tissues sampled from 551 fish, 1 spleen and 1 kidney sample from a single adult female fish collected in spring, 2012 tested positive for VHSV by rRT-PCR, and serum from the same fish tested positive by VN and ELISA. These results suggest that VHSV persists and viral transmission may be active in Lake Winnebago even in years following outbreaks, and that wild fish may survive VHSV infection and maintain detectable antibody titers while harboring viral RNA. Influxes of immunologically naive juvenile fish through recruitment may reduce herd immunity, allow VHSV to persist, and drive super-annual cycles of transmission that may sporadically manifest as fish kills.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 26%
Researcher 2 11%
Student > Bachelor 2 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Professor 1 5%
Other 6 32%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 26%
Environmental Science 3 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Other 3 16%
Unknown 4 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 September 2015.
All research outputs
#9,896,739
of 12,360,337 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Clinical Microbiology
#6,052
of 7,013 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#166,855
of 242,274 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Clinical Microbiology
#75
of 122 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,360,337 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,013 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 242,274 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 122 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.