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An epidemiological examination of parenting and family correlates of emotional problems in young children.

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, January 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
40 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
An epidemiological examination of parenting and family correlates of emotional problems in young children.
Published in
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, January 2011
DOI 10.1111/j.1939-0025.2011.01104.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cassandra Dittman, Louise June Keown, Matthew Sanders, Dennis Rose, Susan P. Farruggia, Kate Sofronoff

Abstract

The present article used data from a community sample of primary caregivers of children between 4 and 7 years old to investigate the prevalence and correlates of emotional symptoms in young children transitioning to elementary school. Mothers (n = 3,483) and fathers (n = 1,019) living in metropolitan areas of eastern Australia participated in a telephone survey of parenting practices and child behavioral and emotional problems. Fifteen percent of mothers and 12% of fathers reported that their child showed clinically elevated levels of emotional symptoms. The most common parental responses to a child's anxious or distressed behavior were to use physical contact, talk in a soothing voice, or encourage their child to be brave, while fewer than 10% of parents ignored their child's distress by not giving any attention. For mothers, reports of child emotional symptoms were associated with mothers' use of physical contact to soothe their children, mothers' level of personal stress and depression, their confidence in managing anxious or distressed behavior, and consistency in their application of discipline. Fathers' encouragement of their children to be brave and fathers' confidence in managing anxious or distressed behavior were associated with reduced child emotional symptoms. These findings have implications for the development of universal prevention programs for internalizing disorders in children.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ireland 1 3%
Unknown 39 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 18%
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 13%
Other 9 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 19 48%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 18%
Social Sciences 5 13%
Unspecified 4 10%
Neuroscience 2 5%
Other 3 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 September 2016.
All research outputs
#3,656,287
of 8,409,255 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Orthopsychiatry
#498
of 955 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,934
of 91,219 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Orthopsychiatry
#2
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,409,255 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 55th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 955 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 91,219 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.