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How spatio-temporal habitat connectivity affects amphibian genetic structure

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Genetics, September 2015
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2 tweeters

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

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107 Mendeley
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Title
How spatio-temporal habitat connectivity affects amphibian genetic structure
Published in
Frontiers in Genetics, September 2015
DOI 10.3389/fgene.2015.00275
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexander G. Watts, Peter E. Schlichting, Shawn M. Billerman, Brett R. Jesmer, Steven Micheletti, Marie-Josée Fortin, W. Chris Funk, Paul Hapeman, Erin Muths, Melanie A. Murphy

Abstract

Heterogeneous landscapes and fluctuating environmental conditions can affect species dispersal, population genetics, and genetic structure, yet understanding how biotic and abiotic factors affect population dynamics in a fluctuating environment is critical for species management. We evaluated how spatio-temporal habitat connectivity influences dispersal and genetic structure in a population of boreal chorus frogs (Pseudacris maculata) using a landscape genetics approach. We developed gravity models to assess the contribution of various factors to the observed genetic distance as a measure of functional connectivity. We selected (a) wetland (within-site) and (b) landscape matrix (between-site) characteristics; and (c) wetland connectivity metrics using a unique methodology. Specifically, we developed three networks that quantify wetland connectivity based on: (i) P. maculata dispersal ability, (ii) temporal variation in wetland quality, and (iii) contribution of wetland stepping-stones to frog dispersal. We examined 18 wetlands in Colorado, and quantified 12 microsatellite loci from 322 individual frogs. We found that genetic connectivity was related to topographic complexity, within- and between-wetland differences in moisture, and wetland functional connectivity as contributed by stepping-stone wetlands. Our results highlight the role that dynamic environmental factors have on dispersal-limited species and illustrate how complex asynchronous interactions contribute to the structure of spatially-explicit metapopulations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 103 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 23%
Student > Master 25 23%
Researcher 12 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 9%
Other 8 7%
Other 18 17%
Unknown 9 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 51 48%
Environmental Science 29 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 3%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 <1%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 15 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 November 2015.
All research outputs
#3,142,971
of 6,602,221 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Genetics
#989
of 1,600 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#108,611
of 200,041 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Genetics
#41
of 63 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,602,221 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,600 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 200,041 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 63 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.