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STAT1 modification improves therapeutic effects of interferons on lung cancer cells

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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19 Mendeley
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Title
STAT1 modification improves therapeutic effects of interferons on lung cancer cells
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12967-015-0656-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Junjie Chen, Jialu Zhao, Lefu Chen, Nian Dong, Zhaojian Ying, Zhenzhen Cai, Dongxiang Ji, Yong Zhang, Li Dong, Yuping Li, Lei Jiang, Michael J. Holtzman, Chengshui Chen

Abstract

Interferons (IFNs) have potent anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, and immunomodulatory activities against cancer. However, the clinical utility of IFNs is limited by toxicity and pharmacokinetics making it difficult to achieve sustained therapeutic levels especially in solid tumors. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1 (STAT1) or a modified STAT1 (designated STAT1-CC) that is hyper-responsive to IFN were overexpressed in lung cancer SPC-A-1 and H1299 cells using lentiviral vectors. Transduction efficiency was monitored using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression. After transduction, cells were treated with interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) or interferon-beta (IFN-β) and monitored for cell proliferation, migration, and invasiveness using Cell Counting Kit-8 and transwell chamber assays and for apoptosis using Annexin V detection by flow cytometry. In addition, levels of STAT1, STAT1 Tyr-701 phosphorylation (pSTAT1), fibronectin, and β-catenin were determined using western blotting. In the case of IFN-γ stimulation, levels of S100A4, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and c-fos expression were also determined. We found that expression of STAT1 or STAT1-CC enhanced the effect of IFN-γ and, IFN-β on inhibition of human lung cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasiveness. Moreover, STAT1 and STAT1-CC expression caused increases in pSTAT1 and decreases in fibronectin and β-catenin levels. STAT1-CC showed increased effects compared to STAT1 on IFN-γ induced pSTAT1 and down-regulation of S100A4, PCNA, and c-fos levels. The results show that STAT1-CC exhibited more strength in improving the antitumor response of IFNs in lung cancer cells. Results from this study suggest that combined treatment of IFNs and STAT1-CC might be a feasible approach for the clinical management of lung cancer in the future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 21%
Student > Master 3 16%
Student > Postgraduate 2 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Researcher 2 11%
Other 3 16%
Unknown 3 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 32%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 11%
Unspecified 1 5%
Psychology 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 4 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 September 2015.
All research outputs
#2,253,325
of 6,354,076 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#419
of 1,568 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,574
of 195,749 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#26
of 89 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,354,076 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 63rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,568 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 195,749 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 89 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.