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The cross-sectional association between snacking behaviour and measures of adiposity: the Fenland Study, UK

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Nutrition, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
43 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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37 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
115 Mendeley
Title
The cross-sectional association between snacking behaviour and measures of adiposity: the Fenland Study, UK
Published in
British Journal of Nutrition, September 2015
DOI 10.1017/s000711451500269x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laura O’Connor, Soren Brage, Simon J. Griffin, Nicholas J. Wareham, Nita G. Forouhi

Abstract

Unhealthy dietary behaviours may contribute to obesity along with energy imbalance. Both positive and null associations of snacking and BMI have been reported, but the association between snacking and total adiposity or pattern of fat deposition remains unevaluated. The objective of this study was to investigate the associations between snacking frequency and detailed adiposity measurements. A total of 10 092 adults residing in Cambridgeshire, England, self-completed eating pattern snacking frequency, FFQ and physical activity questionnaires. Measurements included anthropometry, body composition using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan and ultrasound and assessment of physical activity energy expenditure using heart rate and movement sensing. Linear regression analyses were conducted adjusted for age, socio-demographics, dietary quality, energy intake, PAEE and screen time by sex and BMI status. Among normal-weight individuals (BMI<25 kg/m2), each additional snack was inversely associated with obesity measures: lower total body fat in men and women (-0·41 (95 % CI -0·74, -0·07) %, -0·41 (-0·67, -0·15) %, respectively) and waist circumference (-0·52 (-0·90, -0·14) cm) in men. In contrast, among the overweight/obese (BMI≥25 kg/m2), there were positive associations: higher waist circumference (0·80 (0·34, 0·28) cm) and subcutaneous fat (0·06 (0·01, 0·110) cm) in women and waist circumference (0·37 (0·00, 0·73) cm) in men. Comparing intakes of snack-type foods showed that participants with BMI≥25 kg/m2 had higher intakes of crisps, sweets, chocolates and ice-creams and lower intakes of yoghurt and nuts compared with normal-weight participants. Adjusting for these foods in a model that included a BMI-snacking interaction term attenuated all the associations to null. Snacking frequency may be associated with higher or lower adiposity, with the direction of association being differential by BMI status and dependent on snack food choice. Improving snack choices could contribute to anti-obesity public health interventions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 43 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 115 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 4 3%
Italy 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 109 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 19%
Unspecified 17 15%
Student > Master 17 15%
Student > Bachelor 14 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 8%
Other 36 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 27%
Unspecified 24 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 10%
Social Sciences 7 6%
Other 25 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 36. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2018.
All research outputs
#488,448
of 13,698,641 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Nutrition
#329
of 4,679 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,957
of 239,926 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Nutrition
#13
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,698,641 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,679 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 239,926 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.