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On the use of small and cheaper sensors and devices for indicative citizen-based monitoring of respirable particulate matter

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Pollution, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
3 policy sources
twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
78 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
274 Mendeley
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Title
On the use of small and cheaper sensors and devices for indicative citizen-based monitoring of respirable particulate matter
Published in
Environmental Pollution, November 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.envpol.2015.08.035
Pubmed ID
Authors

Milena Jovašević-Stojanović, Alena Bartonova, Dušan Topalović, Ivan Lazović, Boris Pokrić, Zoran Ristovski

Abstract

Respirable particulate matter present in outdoor and indoor environments is a health hazard. The particle concentrations can quickly change, with steep gradients on short temporal and spatial scales, and their chemical composition and physical properties vary considerably. Existing networks of aerosol particle measurements consist of limited number of monitoring stations, and mostly aim at assessment of compliance with air quality legislation regulating mass of particles of varying sizes. These networks can now be supplemented using small portable devices with low-cost sensors for assessment of particle mass that may provide higher temporal and spatial resolution if we understand the capabilities and characteristics of the data they provide. This paper overviews typical currently available devices and their characteristics. In addition it is presented original results of measurement and modelling in the aim of one low-cost PM monitor validation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 274 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 2 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Philippines 1 <1%
Unknown 267 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 53 19%
Student > Master 46 17%
Researcher 41 15%
Student > Bachelor 25 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 18 7%
Other 52 19%
Unknown 39 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 74 27%
Engineering 55 20%
Chemistry 10 4%
Computer Science 10 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 4%
Other 56 20%
Unknown 59 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 July 2019.
All research outputs
#1,128,386
of 18,062,643 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Pollution
#393
of 9,087 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,419
of 247,982 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Pollution
#5
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,062,643 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,087 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 247,982 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.