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MEG–BMI to Control Phantom Limb Pain

Overview of attention for article published in Neurologia medico chirurgica, January 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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29 Mendeley
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Title
MEG–BMI to Control Phantom Limb Pain
Published in
Neurologia medico chirurgica, January 2018
DOI 10.2176/nmc.st.2018-0099
Pubmed ID
Authors

Takufumi YANAGISAWA, Ryohei FUKUMA, Ben SEYMOUR, Koichi HOSOMI, Haruhiko KISHIMA, Takeshi SHIMIZU, Hiroshi YOKOI, Masayuki HIRATA, Toshiki YOSHIMINE, Yukiyasu KAMITANI, Youichi SAITOH

Abstract

A brachial plexus root avulsion (BPRA) causes intractable pain in the insensible affected hands. Such pain is partly due to phantom limb pain, which is neuropathic pain occurring after the amputation of a limb and partial or complete deafferentation. Previous studies suggested that the pain was attributable to maladaptive plasticity of the sensorimotor cortex. However, there is little evidence to demonstrate the causal links between the pain and the cortical representation, and how much cortical factors affect the pain. Here, we applied lesioning of the dorsal root entry zone (DREZotomy) and training with a brain-machine interface (BMI) based on real-time magnetoencephalography signals to reconstruct affected hand movements with a robotic hand. The DREZotomy successfully reduced the shooting pain after BPRA, but a part of the pain remained. The BMI training successfully induced some plastic changes in the sensorimotor representation of the phantom hand movements and helped control the remaining pain. When the patient tried to control the robotic hand by moving their phantom hand through association with the representation of the intact hand, this especially decreased the pain while decreasing the classification accuracy of the phantom hand movements. These results strongly suggested that pain after the BPRA was partly attributable to cortical representation of phantom hand movements and that the BMI training controlled the pain by inducing appropriate cortical reorganization. For the treatment of chronic pain, we need to know how to modulate the cortical representation by novel methods.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 21%
Researcher 5 17%
Student > Bachelor 5 17%
Student > Postgraduate 3 10%
Professor 2 7%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 3 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 34%
Neuroscience 7 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 10%
Engineering 2 7%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 July 2018.
All research outputs
#7,078,015
of 13,218,736 outputs
Outputs from Neurologia medico chirurgica
#110
of 248 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,626
of 266,493 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neurologia medico chirurgica
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,218,736 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 248 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,493 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them